Direct TV’s Commercials For Hateful Jerks: NFL Sunday Ticket

The ad campaign for Direct TV’s NFL Sunday Ticket raises the question: if it is despicable, unethical and wrong to do something hateful to another individual because of his race,religion or national origin, can it be cute, funny or socially acceptable to take the same action against someone because of his pro football loyalties?

The Direct TV campaign, depicts the fans of various NFL teams expressing their anger and dismay over the fact that the satellite television service allows neighbors who have recently moved to their area can continue to root for their home town football teams by subscribing to NFL Sunday Ticket. In each commercial, a fan expresses his or her hatred for the newcomer by inflicting some form of surreptitious insult,  indignity, or attack:

  • In Wisconsin, a Green Bay Packers fan welcomes her 49er fan neighbor by leaving a cake on his stoop. The cake reads “DIRT BAG.”
  • A group of Patriots fans in wintery Foxboro, Mass. grumble about the Miami Dolphin fan next door (“Moron!” says one woman). One of them throws a shovelful of snow on the Miami fan’s door.
  • A Dallas Cowboy fan sends her dog to trash and pee in her Redskin fan neighbor’s house.
  • In another Dallas setting, a diner, the waitress expresses her contempt for Philadelphia Eagles fans by secretly squeezing her dishrag into their beers.

Yes, hate is hilarious, isn’t it? And normal. And justified, especially if the person you are hateful to has really asked for it by rooting for a rival of your favorite team.

Or, perhaps, by expressing favor with a public official you don’t like, perhaps, disagreeing with you regarding a subject you feel passionately about, like abortion, gun control, illegal immigration, or the Ground Zero Mosque.

At a time when public discourse is dangerously uncivil, and when public figures like Nancy Pelosi, Sharon Angle, Alan Grayson, Mark Levin, Keith Olbermann and Glenn Beck vocally equate differences in political philosophy and policy preference with racism, anti-Americanism, fascism, and stupidity, it is stunningly irresponsible for Direct TV to be portraying hate as a joke. The shovelful of snow? (“Whoops!” the shoveler says.) OK—I’ll give them a pass on that. But a cake reading “Dirt Bag” left on the stoop of a black family in a white neighborhood would be taken as a threat: is it really that much less of an offense if the motivation for the insult is football rather than race? I don’t think so. The reason behind a hateful act isn’t what makes the act unethical—it’s the hateful act itself. Is Direct TV really saying that the same hateful act that would be socially deplorable if motivated by race or religion is merely amusing if the target is the fan of a rival football team? It is significant that none of the fans being persecuted in the ads are black. I guess that spot where the Atlanta Falcons fans burn a cross on the lawn of the Steelers fan next door didn’t make the cut.

Two of the commercials depict crimes: the urinating dog, which is trespass, vandalism and destruction of property, and the waitress putting dishwater in the beer. Yes, they are fictional, but they trivialize a serious social problem. Hateful crimes against person and property are not cute, and they are far too common to be treated in such a cavalier manner. Direct TV’s ads celebrate hateful jerks, and may encourage them.

The campaign is irresponsible, and unhealthy for our culture, especially now. They should be removed.

61 Comments

Filed under Arts & Entertainment, Business & Commercial, Daily Life, Etiquette and manners, Government & Politics, Law & Law Enforcement, Popular Culture, Race, Religion and Philosophy, Sports, U.S. Society

61 responses to “Direct TV’s Commercials For Hateful Jerks: NFL Sunday Ticket

  1. Jeff

    What about those Hot Pocket commercials for “free-eaters,” who don’t eat at tables and are the source of scorn and even vandalism?

    • There is a new one on direct TV I feel has bigotry in it. How about an all black commercial with one white guy who is a BUTLER? and gets socked in the stomach from a small black kid… In my opinion, Direct TV’s “best offer of the year” commercial On you tube has bigotry.

      • adt

        I too find this commercial very offensive, and racially vulgar.

        • rachel

          You take yourself too seriously.

          • Prove it.
            In fact, I don’t take myself particularly seriously at all, but I do take the topic, ethics seriously. If you want to argue that I am taking Direct TV’s anti-social ads too seriously, you have a lot of company, but that tells you exactly nothing about how I take myself.

            You comment, however, is sloppy enough thinking that it tells me that you don’t take analysis and logic seriously enough.
            Too bad. It will get you in the end. It always does.

  2. David Born

    It’s comedy and good old fashioned team rivalry so Give me a break you obvious hater of sports. Remove these spots??..Why don’t we just remove closed minded people like you from watching TV at all. We should Cancel the stupid reality shows and cut throat competition shows where we throw people agaist walls and dislocate their shoulders..that is TRUE hatered and back stabbing. Not a bunch of comedians trying to make ya laugh. May I suggest you read a book and get a life ‘ethics patrol’ ..geeze….

    • 1) I’m a serious sports fan and published on the topic of sports ethics. Good guess.
      2) Old fashioned team rivalry never involved assault and trespass.
      3) Sportsmanship includes fans as well as athletes, and that means respect and competition, not hate.
      4) The commercials celebrate the kind of “fans” that throw batteries at outfielders and send death threats to stars on the other teams. Maybe that’s the kind of fan you are. Nothing to be proud of, though.
      5) Even competitions where they “throw people against walls” doesn’t involve cowardly insults and attackers by people who don’t have the guts to reveal themselves to their victims.
      6) See, actors are portraying someone else The commercials are not about acting.
      7) It’s good to hear now and then from the segment of the population that doesn’t comprehend values and how they have to be conveyed, reinforced and taught. Thanks!

      • Hank Stupi

        Sorry if this is a duplicate. I generally like to let things roll off my back, but I found these Direct TV commercials so very offensive that I felt compelled to express my opinion. Here are some comments about this topic from http://www.pissedconsumer.com

        Mine is the second

        #1 The commercial with the waitress wringing out a dish cloth into customers glass is very offensive. Surely you could come up with better advertisments. We are customers of Direct TV and are VERY satisfied but had to write and tell you my opionion of that ad. Bring it to the higherups. Thank you for your time…

        #2 I too find this commercial distasteful. This and the three other similar direct TV commercials I have seen (man throwing snow on his neighbor’s door, NY cab driver slamming on brakes and then stranding two people, and a cop tazing an innocent person) show the absolute worst behavior in people. It is hard for me to understand the mentality of people who find this sort of thing funny.

        #3 I find the commercial with the waitress wringing out the cloth and sticking her finger in the customer’s drink was very offensive to resturants. I now think twice about going into a resturant to eat fearing I may say something that the waitress does not like. I feel that is very nasty.

        #4 I too found it very offensive. Nothing like that would ever want me to hook up with Direct TV.

        • jimmy

          Give me a break!
          If you are offended, don’t watch the commercial.

          It’s humor. Sports has NOTHING to do with religion, or sexual preference. On those issues, I’ll back you 100%.

          You don’t have a right not to be offended, plain and simple.

          If my neighbor (being the fan of a rivaling team) left me a cake that said “dirtbag”, I would laugh uproariously and probably make a friend.

          Sports rivalry is just that, sports rivalry. Healthy smack-talk, harmless bias shown “just for fun”.

          If you can’t handle it, go pound sand =o)

          • How about if your neighbor poisoned your coffee, stranded you in a slum, or had a dog pee all over your furniture? Still laughing, are you? Yes? Wow…You are a GREAT sport! My hat’s off to you. First of all, you can’t tell if a commercial is offensive until you watch it. Second, something can be both funny and harmful.

            • jimmy

              I’m speechless as to how uptight you are over this!

              I don’t mean any disrespect; I just disagree wholeheartedly!

              It’s a commercial, a silly fantasy.
              If my neighbors dog peed on my couch, you can bet they would be buying me a couch or facing criminal charges, but that’s the idea of a funny TV commercial: Fun, fantasy, theatre of the mind, and “what if”….NOT REALITY.

              It’s just funny, and not harmful at all.

              Do you think a coyote would really drop acme bombs on the road runner?

              It’s a gag. Energy spent calling it “offensive” could be much better spent doing something productive, like baking cakes for 49ers fans, or…..feeding the hungry =o)

              • jimmy

                I will say this:
                The dish rag was a little over the top, but again…..it’s fantasy land.

                Extreme situations force a laugh.

                Only an idiot would do it in real life.

                • As I have already said, without the dishrag, I wouldn’t have written the original post.

                  And there is considerable evidence that many food servers do a whole lot worse that that to customers they don’t like.

              • I’m not uptight at all. There are 900 ethics posts here–I can’t help it if people are more defensive about obnoxious commercials than they care about lying politicians.

                Commercials both reflect and influence public attitudes and culture. Cartoons are distinct in their impact from live actor scenarios. There is no right or wrong in Toon Town.

      • David Born

        Ok…the dish rag bit is bit much…it is..disease and such. But, I did not see any batteries or guns..so, stay on task man. I am as much against fan violence as you are. I Don’t condone it. No way. But the , cabbie comercial is pretty funny. If it’s done farscical and no one gets hurt physically..then I’m good with it. Rememeber our society condones the humiliation of thousands of people on reality shows for our amusement. Go get them my foe..there doing a heck of a lot more damage to the American psyche than a few commercials will ever do. You are mis- directed from the root of the problem: Complacancy to violence…real violence.

        • Confession: had it not been for the dishrag, I probably would not have done the post. That one put it over the line….though the dog and the Texas bimbo and the old man is pretty bad.

          I’ve done a lot about the reality shows, especially over at The Ethics Scoreboard—Anna Nicole, Danny Bonaduce, The Swan, Wife Swap–also Jon and Kate and Kids Nation. And there will be more.

    • Frank

      And I suppose, that you David, would be first in line there to wring out the dirty dishrag in someone’s iced tea? It is not a joke and it has nothing to do with sports rivalry, it is despicable and it panders to a select bigoted audience.

      • You make a good point: in all of these spots, the aggressor is a dislikable stereotype, and often one who is subject to real bias in real life: the immigrant cab driver, the cop, the Texas golddigger, the fat, Family Guy-type Boston townie, the Southern truck stop waitress. It allows the audience to denigrate a “type” while getting vicarious enjoyment from their rotten conduct. Clever!

      • Cindy

        This commercial should be pulled everytime I see it turns my stomach this is not funny it is disgusting. The action is against the law. I will not buy services from direct tv and I find it very difficult anymore to eat out.

        • jimmy

          Cindy,

          If a commercial causes you to not want to eat out, you need more help than we can give you here.

          Lighten up, life is good =o)

          • The Mrs

            Thank you Jimmy!! THAT commercial is HILARIOUS!! I PERSONALLY give the Green Bay DIRTBAG platter my HIGH FIVE as the best and funniest! People…..get a life…….and like Jimmy says…..”you need help!” Im thinking McDonalds wont go out of biz w/out you and NOR will DIRECT TV!!!

            • All of Direct TV’s recent ads promote stealing, violence, hate or mean-spirited behavior. One may be funny; collectively, they show a management with a low opinion of sports fans, and general sadistic tendencies. It’s good to hear from their target audience. Instructive. Thanks.

            • You think “Dirt bag” is hilarious, and I need help. Uh-huh. Whatever you say, ace.

    • The Mrs

      Wow…….what a poor insight to good clean all around team HUMOR! Obviously youre not a sports fan. THANK YOU DAVID BORN!!! HIGH FIVE TO YOUR REPLY TO THIS ARTICLE! Im a Packer Fan as I was born and raised in Appleton, WI and while looking to legally download the GB vs 49er fan commercial I ran into THIS crap article. Funny thing is? I was looking for this commercial because my best friend who was born/raised a 49′r fan LOVES IT ALSO!!!!!!!!

  3. Hank Stupi

    I generally like to let things roll off my back, but I found this form of advertising so very offensive that I felt an obligation to express my opinion. Here are some comments I found at http://www.pissedconsumer.com

    Mine is the second one listed:

    #1 The commercial with the waitress wringing out a dish cloth into customers glass is very offensive. Surely you could come up with better advertisments. We are customers of Direct TV and are VERY satisfied but had to write and tell you my opionion of that ad. Bring it to the higherups. Thank you for your time…

    #2 I too find this commercial distasteful. This and the three other similar direct TV commercials I have seen (man throwing snow on his neighbor’s door, NY cab driver slamming on brakes and then stranding two people, and a cop tazing an innocent person) show the absolute worst behavior in people. It is hard for me to understand the mentality of people who find this sort of thing funny.

    #3 I find the commercial with the waitress wringing out the cloth and sticking her finger in the customer’s drink was very offensive to resturants. I now think twice about going into a resturant to eat fearing I may say something that the waitress does not like. I feel that is very nasty.

    #4 I too found it very offensive. Nothing like that would ever want me to hook up with Direct TV.

  4. R. Avallini

    Excellent article. Right on. However, what the writer missed were the extremely offensive stereotypes of people around the country. I lived in Dallas for THIRTY YEARS and have NEVER met anyone who talked like the imbeciles on these Direct TV commercials. Everyone from the South is portrayed as a banjo-strumming yokel. In fact, there are three spots running now on Dallas and its fans, all with the same offensive and inaccurate theme. The first shows an Anna Nicole Smith gold-digger figure who sounds like she just fell off a peach tree. The second are a couple of yokels in a taxi in NYC (even though the presumably live in the Dallas area with 6 million people, they presumably look like they just came off a farm). Finally, today I saw the one about some bee-hived waitress in a diner surrounded by people who look like extras in “Deliverance.” Here’s a few messages to the morons from the NYC ad agency who created these offensive ads: Almost no one in Dallas wears a cowboy hat or talks like these yokels. I guess it’s much easier to perpetuate ugly offensive stereotypes about people for some cheap laughs. Maybe next you will make fun of dumb Polish people and lazy Mexicans. It’s open season when it comes to Direct TV’s advertising.

    • You know, I came thiiiiiis close to getting into the stereotype issue, but decided that the meanness of the spots was more clear-cut. Comic stereotypes are staples, and they have their place. I agree that the Direct TV versions feel wrong—especially the Texas gold-digger. I’m from Massachusetts, and the Patriots fans depicted weren’t really bad at all as caricatures, which makes the series worse: why the nasty Southern and Texas depictions? If you’re going to make fun of regional types, do it equitably.

      • jimmy

        Ugh.

        You are that guy: “Even Steven”.
        “Do it equitably” Come on now!

        So you’d be ok with it if the Boston guy had a shrillier accent or bad teeth to make him less likeable?

        You seem like a smart guy, so why not do something more worthwhile, like attack the larger issues like reality shows, real hate, etc…

        • On Ethics Alarms, there are exactly two comments about commercials that endorse bad conduct while selling products, and all the rest on the “reality shows, real hate, etc.” topics. Nothing’s stopping you from commenting on those admittedly greater issues. If you use your time so well, why concentrate your comments on the lower end of the importance scale? You’re the one whose priorities are out of whack, not mine. I believe about .25 percent (The is , one quarter of 1%) of my commentary here is about commercials; 100% of your comments are. Quiz: Which of us is misallocating effort?

  5. Adrian

    Oh wow. I stumbled upon this site while searching for the video to show one of these ads to some friends. You folks are about the prissiest bunch I’ve ever come across. Do yourselves and everyone you know a huge favor: Loosen up. These commercials are hilarious! My favorite was the waitress in the diner until I saw the New York cab driver who left his passengers at “Central Park.” That one is awesome.

    • There’s no way to respond to this, really, except that it just shows a coursening of humor and manners. Physical comedy and slapstick comedy seldom involve hurting or threatening innocent people just just for the fun of it, when there are no element of “pay back” or obnoxious conduct to earn the treatment meted out. Tell me: what wouldn’t you find funny, if adulterating food and intentionally stopping so passengers smash into the windshield is “hilarious”? If the next commercial shows a funny Steelers fan setting a Broncos fan on fire, or a Jets fan throwing acid in a Patriot fans’ face, will you laugh away? What’s the difference?

      • Frank

        I suppose a pie in the face aka Three Stoogers style would be considered a physical assault on a person then. The problem in our society isnt a commercial that shows ridiculous people doing ridiculous things. We demean woman sexually, insult religion, show explicit violence in our movies and T.V. and hail pop stars as heros. yet you concentrate on a commercial that shows a Texas couple being left in a park and actually mention the stoping of the car quickly as being violent? You have too much time on your hands my friend.

        • Well, Frank,me lad, I’m going to give you the courtesy of a civil reply and ignore the fact that you neither read the article carefully nor comprehended it. An ad is not the same thing as a cartoon or a comedy sketch, and though the unsubtle may not pick up on the difference, an ad series like the Direct TV collection depict “regular Americans” in a particular light. The Three Stooges are funny (if one thinks they are funny) specifically because they aren’t like us—ads always imply that those using the products are like us, because they strive for identification. The Direct TV ads glorify mean-spirited conduct, up to assault, and suggest that the real thing is trivial. A child knows cartoons depict a fantasy world—commercials are usually not compete fantasy worlds. These commercials coursen the culture. You have a right to disagree, but I assure you, no such ads would have made it to the air even ten years ago. You think that is progress? I don’t.

          (By the way, the car stops so the couple slam faces into the glass. Yes, that’s violent. Try it if you don’t believe me.)

          Meanwhile, the suggestion that my devoting one out of nearly 800 posts to this admittedly low Wattage issue shows that I am ignoring more important matters is lazy on your part, unfair, and absurd. I don’t have to write about everything that is unethical in each post, nor would it be possible.

      • Ed

        Oh get over it and by the way the lady in the Dallas Cowboy’s/Redskins commercial isn’t strumming a banjo. Don’t make things up!!!! The ads are satire and you over feminized men act like a bunch of old women at a quilting bee. Sorry Directv upset you with their thoughtless and hilarious commercials, go hug a tree.

    • R. Avallini

      Man, you just don’t get it Adrian. Wouldn’t you be upset if a commerical portrayed Mexicans as lazy, or Polish people as stupid, or Irish as drunks? Yet for whatever reason, it is OPEN SEASON on Southerners and Texans. The media consistently portrays people from this region as redneck bigots with no education. That might be fine in a movie comedy. But a national television campaign targeted to millions of people is no where to play on ugly regional stereotypes. What next, a spoof on the KKK? As I said in my previous post, I lived in Dallas for 30 years and had season tickets to Cowboy games throughout the 1970s and 1980s. No one, and I mean NO ONE I knew wore a cowboy hat or talked like those yokels. If anything, Dallas is more like Chicago or Los Angeles than anything associated with the Deep South. Yet, leave it to some New York-based PR agency to dig up old stereotypes and ridicule millions of people. I don’t consider that to be edgy advertising. I consider that to be offensive.

      • These gross regional stereotypes do have the feel of being made by someone who believes them. I think, as a culture, we have to go back to the sense of the 20s and 30s, when all groups were grossly stereoptyped for humor, or declare them unfair and abusive across the board. If a commercial can’t, and shouldn’t, portray a limp-wristed queen, an avaricious Jew, a lazy Puerto Rican or a buck-toothed, thick-spectacled Japanese, then I don’t see why a drawling red-neck Texan waitress makes the cut. Frankly, I’d opt for the anything goes rule, if it were applied across the board. But it never would be, now would it?

      • jimmy

        YOU still don’t get it.

        People don’t choose to be Mexican. The analogy does not hold up.

        This is FOOTBALL, a GAME!

        Religion and ethnicity is NOT a game.

        These commercials are funny and harmless.

    • jimmy

      Thank you, Adrian.

      I rarely indulge in internet banter over non-crucial issues (aka: I have a life like you) but this train wreck just freaked my interest and I had to post a few times.

      Those commercials make me laugh…hard!

  6. Pingback: Direct TV's Commercials For Hateful Jerks: NFL Sunday Ticket … | Forex Feeders

  7. Bill K.

    I love ALL of these new commercials for Direct TV. I think they’re absolutely hilarious and crack up everytime I see one. Anyone that doesn’t like them is a “fuddy-duddy” and shouldn’t be watching TV anyway. They should be down in a hole in their basement living it up. Chill out!

  8. Don C.

    Well… it used to be that when you talked with or wrote a letter to somone you would consider the feelings of who you were talking to and get your point across without offensive chacterizations. Those days are gone, destroyed by our immediate communication fettishes and the internet.

    Direct tv’s latest example of offensive commercials involves two police officers tazering a citizen at home. Now you might say “what damage does this do?” Consider the Indianapolis area where there are currently serious problems with police-community relations. Is this a good idea to run these ads or will this backfire in Direct tv’s face? It seems they are not even considering their own best interests in running these thoughless efforts at marketing. That seems to be their key word and policy “thoughless”.

  9. Bill Aitken

    You have finally gone PC on my Jack. Its just a damn commercial for gods sake. When there so many other problems to deal with and you are worried about commercials?

    • Don C.

      Yes, definitely. These commercials play out a systemic problem in most all communication. It has to do with where are we going as a society and how we choose to treat each other. Of course society changes but unless you are aware of it direction, you are clueless to effect your own beliefs. These commercials are brought to you by the people who write your children’s textbooks and who give you comments and surveys about your political views.

      Yes, there are many problems to tackle these days, so pick one!

      • Bill Aitken

        I have and it is certainly not something as inconsequential or silly as an ad campaign.

        • I think picking one’s battles is wise, and this one is pretty low on my list, too. But the repertoire here is broad by necessity. The question also remains: it it’s so trivial compared to other matters, why are so many people interested in it, relatively speaking?

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  12. Mary Dee

    I’m disgusted with direct tv’s ads during NFL foodball. Couldn’t someone start a campaign on Facebook or someplace to shame them into stopping them?

  13. Garry Shirts

    The ad that repulses me is the ad that shows the old man sitting in a chair with a Dallas Cowboy Star on his lap looking vacant and stupid. It is one of the ugliest, agist, ads I’ve ever seen. As an old person, 76, I wonder what they were thinking when they produced that ad. Is that what they think old people are like? Are they assuming only young people like sports? Are they only interested in the 18 to 40 market? I’ve written to them but the only response I’ve received is, “we’ve sent your letter along to the important people in the organization”. I or someone should put that ad on U tube with the message superimposed on it “Why does Direct TV hate old people?” Or better yet, include some symbol that indicate membership in a religion, a cross or a star of David, or make the person black. Think about the outrage that would occur.

    • I agree, Garry—that ad—indeed the whole series—takes cheap shots at more than one stereotype—the Anna Nicole Texas bimbo, the incontinent, dazed senior…other ads ridicule immigrants, Russians, and blue-collar waitresses. They are just hateful, ugly ads…intentionally so. DirectTV will keep running them until there is evidence that they are losing more business than they attract.

  14. SJ

    It is obvious by the comments here that DirectTV had hit on a genius idea. Thank you for your blog.

  15. Robert Hill

    I agree completely that the commercials are despicable and not the least bit funny. I do not have DirectTV but I certainly would not consider it based purely on their irresponsible commercials. If this is the best their ad team can come up with then they need to get a new crew. The more people I talk to the more I believe that people are getting fed up with the scummy reality tv that’s all over tv now. The tv executive’s idea of a good show is to scour the country for the dumbest, crudest, scummiest people and put them on tv and call it a reality show. Unfortunately the DirectTV ads fit right in with this mentality.

    • And yet the current Direct TV ads are creative and funny.

      • Robert Hill

        I still do not see humor in portraying irresponsible acts that could result in serious injury or death as humorous. Falling through a building’s skylight and crashing a car into a restaurant could both cause injury and/or death. Creative? Hardly, I think they watched a couple of episodes of America’s Funniest Videos to get their ideas. Injury and possible death is just not funny to me. Take the high road.

        • I think an absolutist attitude against “portraying irresponsible acts that could result in serious injury or death as humorous” qualifies as “humor impairment,” or “boy do I not want you in the audience if I’m directing a comedy.” The orientation rules out much of the world’s greatest comedy and comics, including Chaplin, Lloyd, Lucille Ball, Dick Van Dyke, Keaton, Monty Python, and Bugs Bunny. Too bad.

  16. Robert Hill

    “An ad is not the same thing as a cartoon or a comedy sketch, and though the unsubtle may not pick up on the difference, an ad series like the Direct TV collection depict “regular Americans” in a particular light. The Three Stooges are funny (if one thinks they are funny) specifically because they aren’t like us—ads always imply that those using the products are like us, because they strive for identification. The Direct TV ads glorify mean-spirited conduct, up to assault, and suggest that the real thing is trivial. A child knows cartoons depict a fantasy world—commercials are usually not compete fantasy worlds.” These are your words. I guess the real thing such as falling through a building’s skylight and crashing a car into a restaurant is being presented as trivial whereas in real life there are severe consequences including injury and prosecution.

    • Yes, well you appear to miss a key distinction between the two add campaigns. In the one I posted on, unethical conduct was presented as reasonable and involved stereotypes, with outrageous but plausible conduct being dismissed as cute of trivial. The current ad campaign is clearly antic and fantastic (playing war games with Charlie Sheen; a baby in a dog collar), and recognizable by any cognizant viewer—or so I thought—as pure silliness. Plus the ad tells even the most gullible viewer NOT to engage in the dangerous conduct.

      Wow.

      • Robert Hill

        Yea, wow! I know we’re all below your elitest attitude. It’s got to be tough when your own words are your worst enemy for your argument.

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