Marketing the Glock and Corporate Social Responsibility

Dr. Chris MacDonald has a thoughtful post on this topic on the always excellent Business Ethics Blog. “The social benefits of selling handguns may be fundamentally contentious; in other words, reasonable people can agree to disagree,” he writes. “But I doubt that the same can really be said for marketing moves designed, for example, to foster the sale of high-capacity magazines (ones that hold 33 bullets instead of the usual 17).”

You can read the whole article here.

2 thoughts on “Marketing the Glock and Corporate Social Responsibility

  1. These “specialty” magazines for automatic pistols are usually of pretty dubious ultility. Not only do they extend far beyond the pistol’s magazine well (an thus get in the way more often than not) but they also tend to malfunction easily. I understand that this may be what occured in Tucson and prevented a greater casualty list. Most top of the line 9mm pistols (like the military’s M9 Beretta) have a standard 15 round magazine capacity. However, with any experienced pistoleer, they can be reloaded in short order. Loughner, fortunately, was not experienced. But in that sort of scenario, he didn’t have to be.

    I don’t doubt that there’ll be a renewed call by anti-gunners for banning extended magazines and pistols of “high” magazine capacity. The alleged reason- and its concurrent appeal to public emotion- is invalid. These pistols are also of utility to law abiding citizens to protect others. They are also so common that to ban them would be the near equivalent of banning auto pistols entirely and bringing ruin on manufacturers. Which is, of course, the real reason why the anti-gunners will (as they have before) demand it.

    It should be noted that even a small woman with a derringer in her purse could have stopped that attack. Loughner rampaged through that crowd at close quarters because he knew he faced no armed opposition. The type of pistol or magazine he chose would have made little difference under those circumstances.

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