Ethics Hero: Arby’s!

Why don’t businesses do this kind of thing all the time?

A 97-year-old  World War II veteran who calls himself “Mr. Doug” has been eating lunch, by himself, at an Arby’s in Chandler, Arizona almost every day.

An employee asked him why he was such a regular. The veteran told him that he has no family, and that he always has the same thing at the fast food restaurant because it is one of the rare meals that doesn’t upset his stomach.

The Arby’s staff took a collection and bought Mr. Doug a $200 gift card, and even gave him their phone numbers, so if he can’t get to Arby’s they will deliver lunch to him. Then corporate headquarters learned about the staff’s kindness, and went one better: It  announced that Mr. Doug could eat at Arby’s free of charge for the rest of his life.

My WWII vet Dad would have been 97 this year. Unfortunately, he hated Arby’s.

A suggested modified slogan for the company, which I’m sure Ving Rhames could deliver with gusto:

“Arby’s! We have THE ETHICS!”

34 Comments

Filed under Business & Commercial, Character, Ethics Heroes, Philanthropy, Non-Profits and Charity, Workplace

34 responses to “Ethics Hero: Arby’s!

  1. I just tried sharing this on Facebook and got a popup error message…

    Query Error
    Error performing query.

  2. Neat story, I hope it’s actually all true.

  3. Plain old shaved beef makes a great sandwich, I like their menu and refusal to apologize for serving meat when other places seem to. (though I will say I wish they had more non-bread entrees)

  4. Matthew B.

    Eliminate all doubt by using the Facebook debugger tool:

    https://developers.facebook.com/tools/debug/sharing/?q=https%3A%2F%2Fethicsalarms.com%2F2018%2F12%2F29%2Fethics-hero-arbys%2F

    Response: This webpage contains a blocked URL

  5. Andrew Wakeling

    Intriguing. I have copied this page to Facebook without any problem. Maybe us Australians are considered more robust and don’t need Nanny protecting us from discomforting infection? But is Nanny protecting my US friends I wonder? Could Ivan (the Russian) be driving this?

  6. RE the talented Mr. Rhames, he’s had a solid career and been in any number of flicks I’ve enjoyed.

    Baby Boy is one; the other one (IMHO) is better:

    Don King: Only In America!

  7. Chris Marschner

    Nice story. I’ll make a point to choose Arbys for lunch next month.

  8. Other Bill

    Let’s hear it for some minimum wage restaurant workers in The Valley of the Sun. (Chandler is a town in the Phoenix metroplex.) Hooray! And good for them knowing what World War II was.

    • Extra points if they know the Second World War actually started well before 1941 (in 1939, by the test that there were hostilities in most parts of the globe, and even earlier if you count localised hostilities that merged with the later ones).

      • Other Bill

        Let’s not get carried away, P.M. Who, where and when? That’s a bridge too far. I’ll content myself with their knowing what. Hah.

        • …I would be content if they knew the major participants… just the major ones. Italy and France would be a bonus.

          (No, Italy was NOT a major participant… just a vocal one. Germans defended North Africa and Italy from the Allies.

          France surrendered and spent the war eating cheese and fearing the Gestapo. Thus and forevermore earning the title ‘Cheese eating surrender monkeys’)

          • … No, Italy was NOT a major participant… just a vocal one. Germans defended North Africa and Italy from the Allies…

            That happens not to be the case. Italy was a major threat in North Africa for a year or so, luckily (for us) handicapped by having its best forces and generals pocketed in Abyssinia and Eritraea. Those forces, though, succeeded brilliantly despite a shortage of supplies until that finally told against them; they even managed to invade and conquer British Somaliland – which means that Italy was the Axis power that first made material gains of British territory.

            … France surrendered and spent the war eating cheese and fearing the Gestapo. Thus and forevermore earning the title ‘Cheese eating surrender monkeys’ …

            If I may put it politely, that simply isn’t so.

            My uncle Arnold, along with most French troops, was caught in the Maginot Line forts. They all wished to continue fighting but were unable to do so. They had to be ordered to stand down after the civilian government issued a surrender – which only happened because a large number of politicians weren’t there any more as they were looking for a place to continue the fight (google “Leon Blum”). In fact, the French were so willing to fight when ordered that the outnumbered French in Tunisia inflicted the first U.S. land casualties in the western theatres.

            As for “fearing the Gestapo”, my grandfather was arrested by them and my grandmother was so enraged by this that she went and pounded on the front door of their H.Q. in Paris and demanded that they let him out. (After carefully looking at the case, they let him out but locked her up instead.)

            • None of what you said negated my analysis. A few stories here and there do not change the overall picture.

              Neither country had a large impact on the outcome of the war, especially compared to Germany, Japan, The USSR, Great Britain, and the USA. They were bit actors at best, proxies in the case of the Axis and welfare cases for the Allies. Australia, Mexico, Brazil and Canada are other example of bit actors: they lent land and some troops, but did not have a large impact.

              My respects to your Uncle Arnold. His bravery is not diminished by the incompetence of the French (and British) Government who had the capability but not the will to stop Hitler in the decade before the war.

              • Do you even see that you are shifting your ground? I’ll show you.

                A few stories here and there do not change the overall picture.

                But (a.) they do illustrate it, and (b.) even one counter-example destroys a total generalisation like the one I responded too. It’s a bait and switch to start talking about “the overall picture” now. But if you want to, you should research how many other people were like that in France, or just how much some Italians really did (including the co-belligerents).

                Neither country had a large impact on the outcome of the war, especially compared to Germany, Japan, The USSR, Great Britain, and the USA.

                Do you see that “had a large impact on the outcome of the war”, even if true, is a very different thing from “Italy was NOT a major participant” and “France surrendered and spent the war eating cheese and fearing the Gestapo”? The only countries that “had a large impact on the outcome of the war” in the west were Germany and the U.S.S.R. – but there were lots of major participants.

                By the way, Australia and Canada did a remarkable amount, certainly enough to qualify as major participants (I don’t know enough about the others you cite to comment on them). You might care to look up the size and contribution of the Canadian navy, for instance.

                And what has “the incompetence of the French (and British) Government who had the capability but not the will to stop Hitler in the decade before the war” got to do with any of that, anyway?

                • I made a general comment, which you have decided to pick apart to no good result. This is a progressive Alinsky tactic that I regret I fell for.

                  Now you are working the fringes of intangibles like ‘what constitutes a major participant.’ Fine. Have it your way.

                  You failed to change my mind: in fact, you entrenched my attitudes even deeper with your insufferable nit picking. Good job.

                  Why do you pick fights like this? We could have had a decent discussion, in which we could have given each other points to consider. Instead, you have lowered my respect for your comments in ANY regard. See, that happens when you uses Alinsky tactics.

                  • To be fair, P.M. is not an Alinskyite. He does have a pedant streak, as do many of my very best friends, one of whom I’m having dinner with tonight. The Julie Principle applies.

                    • I will take that into account, then, Jack. I know I have a bias against those who use such tactics now that I have learned to recognize them, and will work to overcome that with regard to P.M.

                      Interesting point: with the exodus of Alinskyites, progressives, classic liberals and the intellectually lazy, I have lost the edge of my keen detector for such tactics. Few here actually use them these days. This is good and bad: a lot of clutter and noise are now removed, but we don’t get certain points of view from which to learn.

                      Oh well: I am far better at detecting rationalizations these days (not because progressives left, but because rationalizations seem to be less prevalent) and have used this new skill in everyday life. A lot of my lazy comforting rationalizations no longer work for me, which is personally enlightening if uncomfortable at times.

                      For that, Jack, you have my eternal thanks: I could not spell ‘rationalization’ when I started reading Ethics Alarms.

                    • I STILL misspell it the first try, every time!

  9. Glenn Logan

    Awesome. My esteem for Arbys has risen significantly. Perhaps I will patronize them again for the first time in a couple of decades.

  10. Brad

    Beautiful of ARBYS

  11. AC

    Tried posting as well, same could not load data from URL error, I’ve opened a support ticket with them will see what reply I get other than an automated one.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.