Morning Ethics Warm-Up, 2/1/2019: Dumb, Dumber, Fake, and Fakiest

At least this guy has hair

If I’m out of bed, it’s morning to me…

1. Update. Wow. My furious ex-Ethics Alarms commenter actually filed a motion to oppose my motion to extend the time to file a response brief to his rambling 70+ page, incoherent rant of an appellant brief, as he tries to get the dismissal of his defamation suit against me overturned. Such extensions are granted as a matter of course and courtesy, and real lawyers never oppose them, so a petty motion like that sends a strategically unwise signal to the court that this is not really a legal matter but an abuse of process to pursue a grudge. Of course, reading the brief itself makes that clear.

2. Incompetent Elected Official Of The Day: Rep. Jason Crow (D-Co), who tweeted about the President sending troops to the border,

This guy needs to be sent back to government kindergarten. Troops are almost always deployed for political reasons, both national and international. Does he remember when LBJ sent troops into Selma? How about Truman using troops to break the railroad worker’s strike? Commenter Tim Levier correctly notes, “What troop was ever deployed for a non-political agenda? They go where the politicians send them. And what better place than in their home country defending their actual borders for national defense?”

The  new class of Democratic representatives is one for the ages. What an idiot.

3. It’s official…The NFL Anthem Protest Ethics Train Wreck is the dumbest ethics train wreck of them all, and dimwits are still boarding it like it’s a luxury bullet train. Today Show co-host Craig Melvin asked Colin Kaepernick’s attorney Mark Geragos: “As you know, a number of the halftime acts have taken heat for performing at the Super Bowl this year, Maroon 5, Big Boy, Travis Scott among them. Does Collin Kaepernick see their participation during the halftime show as some sort of personal affront?” Of course the celebrity attorney answered yes, because he’s paid to say things like that and he’s duty-bound to represent the position of his client no matter how ridiculous that position may be. He is not obligated, however, to mouth gibberish like this:

“I think what it says is, number one, they do take a lot of heat, and I think rightfully so. I mean, the idea that you’re going to basically cross a picket line – because that’s what they’re doing, they’re crossing an intellectual picket line. They’re saying to themselves, “I care more about my career than I do about whether what I’m doing is right”….could cross the intellectual and ideological picket line, I think there’s something wrong with that and they should be called out.”

What the hell is an “intellectual and ideological picket line”? Geragos is saying that if you don’t fall into lockstep with black lives matters propaganda—and that’s all Kaepernick’s kneeling was about, once you decipher his blather—you’re selfish. In fact, Kaepernick and all of his subsidiary kneelers were unilaterally declaring that their vague but passionate political posturing was more important than giving NFL fans what they were paying for, and what the knneler were being paid to deliver: entertainment unpolluted by incoherent political posturing.

Then Melvin noted that given the “successful season for the NFL” in which “ratings are up,” Kaepernick’s “mission” might have failed. What mission? How exactly was kneeling during the National Anthem going to accomplish anything tangible or positive? On the other hand, the fact that no team was foolish enough to hire Kaepernick so its fans didn’t have to endure sidelines anti-American grandstanding from a journeyman quarterback fulfilled the NFL’s mission perfectly: football and profit.

On Super Bowl Sunday, I will be watching Gladys Knight’s rendition of the National Anthem out of respect for her refusal to be bullied by these people. I will then retire to my sock drawer organization duties, so as not to be complicit in the crippling of young athletes for profit.

4. Is it really misspeaking when you say exactly what you meant to say, and then decide later that you wish you hadn’t said it? Kathy Tran, a first-term Democrat from Fairfax County, was one of the supporters of the defeated late-term abortion bill that got Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam in trouble after he calmly explained exactly how a live-born child would be “made comfortable” and then allowed to die if that was the mother’s wishes. When Tran was asked by a Republican lawmaker during the hearing whether the bill would allow for an abortion to occur when a woman is in labor and about to give birth, Tran answered in the affirmative. Now that the details of the radical late-term abortion bill are being made public, however,Tran is denying that “yes” meant “yes.”

“I wish that I was quicker on my feet and I wish that I was able to be more agile in that moment,” Tran told reporters in a telephone interview. “And I misspoke, and I really regret that. I should have said: ‘Clearly, no because infanticide is not allowed in Virginia, and what would have happened in that moment would be a live birth.’ ” Odd, though, that it took her three days to decide that she didn’t say what she meant to say.

Her answer was signature significance, as is her attempt now to deny what she said. Her initial answer shows that she has no respect for or belief in the civil rights of the unborn or the newly born. The denial shows that she lacks courage and integrity.  She belongs in the same rotten category as Jonathan Gruber, the Obamacare architect who gloated about the deception that had been pulled on the American people, then denied what he had said when his recorded remarks were revealed, saying that he had made an unintentional “speako.”

5. Is this the most fake enterprise ever? I wrote about Devumi almost exactly a year ago:

A company named Devumi has made millions by selling Twitter followers and retweets to celebrities, journalists, businesses and anyone who sees a benefit in looking more popular and influential than they are. This is lying to the public by definition, and Devumi is facilitating fraud. It has an estimated stock of at least 3.5 million automated accounts, each sold repeatedly, and has sent more than 200 million imaginary Twitter followers into cyberspace.

A New York Times report identified some of the many “reality television stars, professional athletes, comedians, TED speakers, pastors, models,” and even journalists who deceive the public by buying fake followers, or having their their employees, agents, public relations companies, family members or friends do it for them.

Actor John Leguizamo, the computer billionaire Michael Dell, Ray Lewis, the football commentator and former NFL linebacker, Kathy Ireland, the former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model, Akbar Gbajabiamila, host of the show “American Ninja Warrior,” Hillary Rosen, a Democrat consultant who worked for the Clinton campaign, Richard Roeper, a nationally known film critic, Twitter board member Martha Lane Fox, Fox Business Network Elizabeth MacDonald, and others were identified by the Times, including actress Deirdre Lovejoy, who explained, “Everyone does it.”

Now comes the news that Devumi, which is now out of business, has settled with New York, paying a fine for engaging in internet fraud. We also learn this: “Devumi itself relied on fiction: The company advertised a New York office that did not exist, and Devumi’s founder, German Calas, claimed degrees he had never actually earned.”

What a surprise.

 

 

6 Comments

Filed under Business & Commercial, Character, Childhood and children, Ethics Alarms Award Nominee, Ethics Train Wrecks, Gender and Sex, Government & Politics, Incompetent Elected Officials, Journalism & Media, Law & Law Enforcement, Rights, Social Media, Sports

6 responses to “Morning Ethics Warm-Up, 2/1/2019: Dumb, Dumber, Fake, and Fakiest

  1. Chris Marschner

    Given that Governor Northam is mentioned in this post but not in the context of his controversial medical school yearbook, I would like to say we should be setting an example on evaluating stupid things done in college rather than seeking retribution for Kavanaugh.

    The photo of Northam in med school should not be an indictment of current character. I don’t want to hear apologies of any sort other than “it was stupid and I should have known better”. We should be evaluating people on the totality of behavior since the “bad” behavior. Atonement cannot be made if coerced. It can only happen when it is voluntary.

    If Northam should step down it should not be for some sophomoric photo in a college yearbook, it should be for admitting he is willing to sacrifice an innocent life in order to get the liberal female vote.

    • Ethics Quiz on this one coming up, but you and I are on the same wavelength here.

      • JP

        Seems like a no brainer. Like the Kavanaugh the attack regarding the photo is stupid. Perhaps it is more like the tweets regarding the baseball players (also stupid).

      • philk57

        I am with you – however, I can’t help that little twinge of schadenfreude that comes from seeing the “reverse-Alinski” of the lefties being held to the standard that they hold out for their opponents.

  2. Glenn Logan

    3 NFL

    What the hell is an “intellectual and ideological picket line”?

    WTF? Is this Authentic Frontier Lawyer Gibberish? I think it is.

    Then Melvin noted that given the “successful season for the NFL” in which “ratings are up,” Kaepernick’s “mission” might have failed. What mission? How exactly was kneeling during the National Anthem going to accomplish anything tangible or positive?

    It depends upon how you define “positive.” It has been very positive for Kaepernick, who has made millions off the controversy. It has not been positive for the NFL, but that’s only because they have been tone-deaf incompetents proving once again that locating a competent sports franchise owner is almost as hard as finding the spoor of Chet the Unicorn.

    The fact that it has damaged our cultural fabric, perhaps irreparably, is only a negative for non-Leftists. Not for Kaepernick and his supporters, though. For him, this has all been one big win.

    4 Kathy Tran

    Her initial answer shows that she has no respect for or belief in the civil rights of the unborn or the newly born.

    Now Jack. You know that Democrats get a do-over that non-Democrats do not. Stop being so judgmental and antebellum. Get with the times.

    5 Fake enterprise

    A New York Times report identified some of the many “reality television stars, professional athletes, comedians, TED speakers, pastors, models,” and even journalists who deceive the public by buying fake followers, or having their their employees, agents, public relations companies, family members or friends do it for them.

    They should all be publicly identified and shamed on Twitter as well, should they not? This is the classic drug addition model, where but for the addicts, drug pushers would not exist.

  3. luckyesteeyoreman

    4. I somehow missed the advent of “speako” being added to the culture’s terminology of spin-ology. I get it – like a “typo.” How clever. That gives me hope that one day, even some of the more wacko lefties will note for us their “thinko”s (after all the damage they’ve done is done, of course). Because of course, socialism works – it just hasn’t yet been done right.

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