Morning Ethics Warm-Up, 5/29/2021…Down The Rabbit Hole! An Unethical Ghost, A Stupid Newsreader, And A White-Hating Dean Walk Into A Bar….

Rabbit

Ghost Ethics! I just watched an Amanda Seyfried Netflix movie called “Things Heard And Seen,” which I recommend neither seeing nor hearing. What I got out of it—spoiler alert, if indeed a crummy movie can be spoiled—is that ghost ethics are a little bit “problematic” as Prof. Turley would say. The spooks don’t quite get the “Fix the problem before it’s too late” obligation. In this movie, the benign ghost of a murdered woman who had been the original owner of an old house bought by an ambitious, sociopathic college professor takes the professor’s victimized wife under her spectral wing, knows that the husband is up to no good, but only does anything proactive to get rid of the husband after the monster has killed F. Murray Abraham (who still looks like Salieri!), run a woman who was on to him off the road, putting her in a coma, and finally chopped up lovely Amanda, who plays the wife, with an ax. THEN the ghost drags the husband to Hell, which we know the ghost knew was going to be his fate before Amanda got the Lizzy Borden treatment.

Talk about locking the barn door after the horse is gone…

1. Isn’t it good to know that news readers all over the world are just as ignorant and incompetent as ours are? Bill Shakespeare, the first man to get a pandemic vaccine, died last week of non-virus causes. A Spanish newscaster, Noelia Novillo, as photos of the Bard’s namesake flashed on the screen, announced the story this way:

‘We’ve got news that has stunned all of us given the greatness of this man. We’re talking about William Shakespeare and his death. We’ll let you know how and why it happened.As we all know, he’s one of the most important writers in the English language – for me the master. Here he is. He was the first man to get the coronavirus vaccine. He’s died in England at the age of 81.”

No word yet regarding whether the station fired this ignoramus. Why bother? She’ll just get a job at CNN…

2. Speaking of locking barn doors…actually more like locking the cellar door after the horse has escaped from the barn…Southwest Airlines announced yesterday that it will not resume alcohol service in June as previously announced, because a woman attacked a flight attendant on a recent Southwest flight in an incident that had nothing to do with alcohol consumption.

Ethics Alarms is so fond of the practice of punishing innocent members of the public for the isolated conduct of a single wrong-doer (Should I call it “The Chauvin Solution”?) and this is even worse. There is no nexus between the incident and Southwest’s response at all, except the unproven theory that if passengers have become unusually cranky during the pandemic (with Southwest insisting that passengers re-mask between sips of Coke), they’ll be even crankier once they’ve had a few little bottles.

3. Add this to the debate about the ethics of giving those who get vaccinated lottery tickets: Several states are following Ohio’s lead and rewarding citizens who should be getting vaccinated because it’s responsible citizenship but are balking by entering them in a special lottery. The White House last week praised vaccine lotteries—of course it did, because the Biden Administration is based on the Leftist idea that the ends justify the means. But innocent victims of the scheme may be people who struggle with gambling addictions. The psychological impact of placing a bet, explains Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, even being unwillingly into a vaccine lottery, could activate the same parts of the gambling addict’s brain that fire up when people are gambling, prompting recovering addicts to head back to the casino “When a state government actively promotes gambling, that creates a mixed message for vulnerable citizens,” Whyte said. “The state has to own that too.” An estimated 2 % of adults in the United States struggle with gambling addictions.

After learning about Maryland’s lottery, recovering gambling addict Michael Aretz tried to contact state officials about removing his name from the daily drawings. He said he wished he had postponed getting vaccinated so he could have avoided being dragged back into gambling.

Eh, just collateral damage. Cannon fodder. So he relapses because the state decides to reward the most irresponsible citizens for “the greater good.” Tough luck.

4. And all deans are unethical and biased propagandists, so there! Kate Slater, assistant dean of student affairs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, wrote on Instagram that all whites—she’s white, see, so she’s an expert—are racists. She then “clarified” her position:

Racist dean

Then,

slater2

This isn’t fact, history or psychology, it’s extremist political ideology, and the dean is using her position to advance Critical Race Theory. Based on Slater’s personal website, she’s a classic race huckster. And a bigot—this isn’t hard: if she hates “whiteness,” and white students are imbued with whiteness, then she is, by her own admission, biased against the students she is supposed to shepherd as dean. It is irresponsible for Brandies to employ someone with such open bias against so many students. It is irresponsible for parents to continue to pay tuition to a school this foolish.

Slater is also a coward. She has made her Instagram account private after others, for some reason, didn’t respond positively to her rhetoric.

16 thoughts on “Morning Ethics Warm-Up, 5/29/2021…Down The Rabbit Hole! An Unethical Ghost, A Stupid Newsreader, And A White-Hating Dean Walk Into A Bar….

  1. On the lottery subject I heard that Chairman Mao opined that “lotteries are disgusting.” I don’t know if he said that but it’s true. Regressive policy that encourages fatalism and “luck.”

  2. I am old enough to remember when it was considered responsible citizenship for young, healthy people to decline the vaccination.

    Can you imagine someone attacking “blackness”, defining it with stereotypes attributed to gangbangers in the ghetto?

  3. “… and no number of statistics or facts that I could offer up are going to convince people to see systemic racism If they don’t want to.”
    She’s right about the statistics, because they do not show the system or parts of a system that are racist or that promote racism. Redlining was systemic racism. Poll taxes were systemic racism. Laws mandating separate drinking fountains and restrooms were systemic racism. College admission guidelines which specify different admission standards by race are systemic racism. In each case, we can identify the law or rule or practice that can readily be seen as racist.
    Statistics about unequal outcomes do not prove systemic racism. They may be cause for investigation, and that investigation may reveal laws or rules or practices that are systemic racism, but in the absence of such laws or rules or practices, the argument for systemic racism is not proven.

    • Actually, I’m not so sure about poll taxes. If they were the same for everyone, then they were not racist.

      • Unfortunately, systemic racism as used in critical race theory explicitly defines unequal outcomes as racist regardless of intent or justification. It’s possible that the original theory does not define the phrase that way, but it seems to be the default explanation. Moreover, it seems to be the purpose of creating the phrase in the first place, because too many objectively reasonable policies had unequal results by race and progressives needed to justify calling them racist anyways. They originally tried to redefine racism itself, but despite attempts to claim that blacks can’t be racist by using their own special definition, it never seemed to take hold as well as the compound phrase has.

        The whole movement is rhetorical trickery.

  4. Kate Slater’s Instagram bio describes her as a “Racial justice scholar and educator. White lady (she / hers). Divest from Whiteness. Do the work.”
    Res ipsa loquitur. If there is any clearer brief self-description of a modern day moron, I have yet to see it.

  5. I am not ‘afraid’ of Critical Race Theory. However, I do believe that it is racist hogwash, and the people who are pushing it are the racists in our society today.

    I am happy to belong to a political party that judges people by the content of their character and not the color of their skin. I think there was someone somewhere who might have mentioned that once upon a time. Unfortunate that the Democrats now believe the opposite.

    • This is the problem with political discussion these days – any argument with progressives is labeled “hate” or “phobia”. I can disagree based on justified reasons that have nothing to do with bigotry, fear, or hate. It seems they think these are the only motives for not enthusiastically agreeing with them

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