Tag Archives: hats

Encore: “The Guy In The Lobster Hat”

(This isn't the guy. I think it's his son...)

(This isn’t the guy. I think it’s his son…)

Longtime reader and commenter Neil Dorr chided me today for writing so much about the post-election media, political, and legal  ethics breaches going on, and not as much on the types of topics I tended to cover on the old Ethics Scoreboard, now an archive of an earlier time  when I thought a few posts a week could cover the topic of societal ethics. I was more innocent then, and I also had to depend on a webmaster: I posted more essays in the first year of Ethics Alarms than the entire output of the Ethics Scoreboard. Neil said he missed posts like the one about “the Lobster Hat”. I have to say, I don’t think there have been many posts likethe  one about the lobster hat, which was one of my occasional “a day in Jack’s strange life” posts. I had forgotten about it completely. I tracked the decade old post down, however, and for Neil, and anyone else who is interested in lobster hats, here it is..

Today I accompanied my wife to a doctor’s appointment that she was dreading, and while we were checking in with the receptionist, a large, rotund fellow with a long white beard walked in to do likewise. On his head was what appeared to be a large, red lobster…a hat of sorts, though not a very seasonable or practical one. It was spectacular, however, with two large claws that drooped down about eyebrow level, and an impressive tail in the back. If I were ordering this specimen at Jimmy’s Harborside in Boston, it would be about a four-pounder.

I was amused at this unexpected sight, and said to my wife, loud enough so Lobster-topped Santa could hear me, “See? You think you have medical problems. This poor guy has a lobster attached to his head!” To my surprise, the man turned sharply and looked at me with a furious glare, snorted, and walked out the door, clearly offended, exactly as if I had said, “Wow! That’s some harelip you have there!” or “Gee, where does a guy as fat as you buy suits?” Continue reading

49 Comments

Filed under Daily Life, Ethics Scoreboard classics, Etiquette and manners, Humor and Satire

The Same Students Who Defend Illegal Immigrants Appropriating American Rights And Benefits Make Clemson Grovel For Borrowing Mexican Culture

sombreros

Actually, they didn’t make Clemson grovel, Clemson chose to grovel rather than teaching the proper lesson, which is that when you live in this melting pot culture, every thing it has belongs to you, and everything you bring to the pot belongs to it. Clemson’ ethical and responsible response to two students who were “offended” by “Mexican Food Night” and students wearing sombreros should have been “Oh, grow up!”

Clemson Dining’s “Maximum Mexican” night is a regular event popular among students.  However, when two students  took to Twitter to protest that the “#CulturallyInsensitive” food fest was offensive, Clemson officials rushed to apologize. The university also has a Irish-themed night for St. Patrick’s Day, but it might survive because the Irish missed their opportunity to become political correctness bullies and dictators.

Another student objected to the wearing of sombreros, saying, “Our culture isn’t a costume and we will not be mocked!” Once again, the correct response from the University was “shut up, you’re embarrassing yourself, and if you can’t understand this country better than that, then you really should do some nation shopping. ” Continue reading

29 Comments

Filed under Citizenship, Education, Rights, U.S. Society

Ethics Hero: President Obama

According to a tweet today from Press Secretary Robert Gibbs, President Obama has quit smoking,

A president’s habits, be it “the vigorous life” of Teddy Roosevelt, not wearing a hat, like Jack Kennedy, or regarding fellatio from interns as “not sex,” as Bill Clinton did, have the power to change public attitudes and conduct for better or worse. This must have been an especially difficult time for Barack Obama to quit his long-time smoking habit, which typically is a response to stress. Despite perhaps the most stressful period in his life, the President did the right thing, and as good leaders must, to set an example.

We will never know for sure how much or how many, but his responsible conduct will undoubtedly change some behavior, and save some lives.

1 Comment

Filed under Ethics Heroes, Health and Medicine, History, Leadership, U.S. Society