Transgender Ethics: Connecticut’s PC And Unfair Gender Rules For Athletic Competition

Transgender high school sophomores Terry Miller and Andraya Yearwood came in first and second place respectively in the 100-meter race at Connecticutt’s State Open Finals this month. Miller also won the top prize for the 200-meter race. She and Yearwood were born male, but they now identify as females, whatever that means.

Wow, what a coincidence! The only transgender females running, and they finished first and second! What are the odds of that?

“Some parents within Connecticut’s high school track and field circle expressed outrage,”  ABC News notes. Some?

It is astounding to me that any parents or runners—though the students are subject to daily PC brainwashing, so I’m sure that’s a factor—put up with the ridiculous and anti-competitive Connecticut Athletic Conference rules. They generously allow high school athletes to compete based on the gender with which they identify.  Says ABC in another masterpiece of equivocation, “Critics say the rules give male-to-female transgender people a competitive edge over cisgender women — whose biological sex matches their gender identity — because some have higher testosterone levels than non-trans females.”

Oh, critics say that, do they? How about a slight edit: “Male-to-female transgender people have  competitive edge over cisgender women whose biological sex matches their gender identity because some have higher testosterone levels than non-trans females.”

“I think it’s unfair to the girls who work really hard to do well and qualify for Opens and New Englands [competitions],” sophomore sprinter Selina Soule, who finished sixth in the 100-meter State Open Finals, told the Hartford Courant. “These girls, they’re just coming in and beating everyone. I have no problem with them wanting to be a girl.”

That is, “Not that there’s anything wrong with that.”

Well, of course it’s unfair. Both Miller and Yearwood make Caitlyn Jenner look like Kate Upton. Letting them compete as women when they are still obviously to a greater or lesser degree young men in some respects turns a girls athletic competition into a sham—but it’s a well-meaning sham. That appears to be the theory.

The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference [CIAC], which governs high school sports, only says that its rules are in alignment with state law, which when passed did not take into consideration big, strong boys being able to compete as girls because they wanted to. Connecticut law would need to be changed before the CIAC could alter its policy, the organization said. Legislators being legislators, they won’t do that unless forced.

Every single parent of every single born-female competitor should pull their daughters out of every event in which a transgender competitor is entered. Until they do, the rigged races will continue.

This is my favorite part: the justification for this undeniably unfair rule offered by Cyd Zeigler, the author of “Fair Play: How LGBT Athletes Are Claiming Their Rightful Place in Sports.”

“I’m really tired of hearing about unfair advantages. The way our entire society is designed, transgender people have inherent disadvantages everywhere they turn,” Zeigler told ABC News. “They want to call these advantages unfair, as though if you’re a cisgender person that any advantage that you might have over someone else are fair. But any advantages that a transgender athlete might possibly have are automatically deemed unfair. Why is that?”

Why? Because it is unfair, that’s why. Zeigler really is arguing that because transgender people have a tough time adjusting to society, they have an inherent right to treat others unfairly.

He is a foolish and unethical person identifying as a respectable expert.

[ Much of this issue was discussed last year, in the case of the reverse case of the transitioning female high school wrestler, who is taking male hormones as she gradually becomes male. Texas has the reverse of Connecticut’s rule: athletes have to compete according to their birth-gender. Thus Matt Beggs, who looked like this last I checked, when he won the 2018 state girl’s wrestling title.

 

..has to compete as a girl wrestler. In Connecticut, he would have to compete as a male, assuming he decided to identify as one. You can review that discussion here.]

 

13 Comments

Filed under Character, Education, Ethics Alarms Award Nominee, Gender and Sex, Government & Politics

13 responses to “Transgender Ethics: Connecticut’s PC And Unfair Gender Rules For Athletic Competition

  1. Chris Marschner_

    Simple solution. All competitions are unisex. Eliminate womens sporting competitions as well as mens and let them all compete in the same but unisex events. This will effectively make Title IX rules moot. We no longer have negro leagues in baseball so why have gender based events. Let the transgendered boys and girls have at it with either sex on the field of competition. Perhaps then we might see why we separated mens and womens sports. I’ll await the activists responses.

    • Andrew V

      None of the big American professional leagues – the NBA, NFL, MLB, or NHL – prohibit women from participating in their rulebook, as far as I know. So these leagues are already unisex competitions, and look at the gender breakdown. Other than Manon Rheaume, an NHL goalie for a couple of games, I think there have been zero women.

    • Aleksei

      That will certainly be the feminist Utopia, once female sports will be effectively obsolete. Talk about the road to perdition. But at least the LGBT lobby will be happy. Who cares about those women anyway, they were probably homophobes, ammirite? But seriously, these power plays are just terrible.

  2. Rip

    Matt Beggs though wants to compete as male, or so he says! But he would be easier to believe if he refused to compete against girls! The fact that he has reptively said so speaks well. Clark Kent quit football when his powers developed. But These girls may identify as female, though if they want to compete should try to challenge them selves rather than taking advantage.

  3. Other Bill

    I’ll say it again, as I do every time this comes up: Let’s give all these gender issue pressure groups what they want- no more men’s and women’s competitions. Just competitions. Anyone can enter. No more boys basketball and girls basketball, just basketball. Girls lose out? Too bad.

    The other day I went to my nine year old grandson’s awards ceremony at the end of a week long basketball camp. Tiny kids through high school, all broken into age groups. The girls were mixed among the boys. One game of second graders was completely dominated by a girl. She even won MVP in her age group. Will she dominate in high school? Probably not. Should there be separate competitions so she can keep playing? Maybe not. She should get an MBA and end up owning a team.

  4. Isaac

    This is not acceptable. On the other hand, I kinda do want to see a 6’10” man in a wig join the WNBA and just run down and dunk the ball on every single possession for an entire game. So I’m torn.

    • Other Bill

      I’d like to see a bunch of third tier guy professional golfers go to the women’s tour and win all the money without breaking a sweat.

  5. This transgender/self-identifying gender politically correct stuff rolling over into physical competition by gender has gone completely over the edge of reality into the realm if the completely absurd. This could make an absolutely hilarious stage show if it weren’t true.

  6. luckyesteeyoreman

    This “inclusive” fad really wrecks a joke I have always liked, and that pisses me off: What’s the difference between a tribe of pygmies (pygmys?) and a girls’ track team? The pygmys are Cunning little Runts…

  7. More or less every sport has regulations putting specifications on what equipment can be used, and that includes the players’ bodies, which is why steroids are normally prohibited. Whatever rules are decided on, they need to be consistently enforced.

    There are plenty of people with medical conditions preventing them from participating in conventional competitive sports. I don’t see why this is a special case.

  8. I am waiting for lawsuits from the parents of girls when this matters… like in college scholarships.

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