Ethics Dunces: Kathryn Rubino, And, As Usual, “Above The Law”

What a vile website Above the Law is! The legal gossip cyber-rag, which belched forth the hateful Elie Mystal (who once argued on the site that black jurors should always refuse to vote “guilty” regarding black defendants regardless of the crime or the evidence), covers the progressively rotting legal profession with gusto, and does everything it can to make the profession even more left-biased than it already is. As a recent article by one of Elie’s successors, Kathryn Rubino, shows, a lack of fairness and decency helps the rotting process a lot.

The headline that caught my eye was “On Second Thought, Maybe Federal Judges Shouldn’t Have Hired The Law School Student Famously Accused Of Saying ‘I HATE BLACK PEOPLE’” I was immediately tempted to headline this post, “On Third Thought, Maybe A Site Run By Lawyers Shouldn’t Promote The Concept That Accusations Alone Justify Wrecking A Lawyer’s Career.”

The lawyer in question is Crystal Clanton, and she’s a conservative, which pretty much explains why ABL is out to get her. The story goes like this: Turning Point, USA, is a much reviled (by Democrats and progressives, and, therefore, the mainstream news media) conservative non-profit. In 2017, the author of a hit piece on Turning Point in The New Yorker wrote that “screenshots provided to me by a source show that Crystal Clanton, who served until last summer as the group’s national field director, sent a text message to another Turning Point employee saying, “I HATE BLACK PEOPLE. Like fuck them all . . . I hate blacks. End of story.”

Yikes. Bad day, Crystal? At the time, she commented on the matter by writing in an email to the New Yorker, “I have no recollection of these messages and they do not reflect what I believe or who I am and the same was true when I was a teenager.” Turning Point USA says that the text wasn’t sent by Clayton, but by a “rogue employee” who hacked her phone. Clayton did leave Turning Point shortly after the message was supposedly sent.

Early on in her ATL article, Rubino signals that she can’t be trusted: though the New Yorker article is her single source for the story, she writes that Clanton sent the inflammatory text to “co-workers.” The New Yorker says the text was sent to one co-worker, who refused to talk about it. That makes sense, because text messages tend to be sent to one person at a time. A mass communication about hating a race is materially different from a message to a single individual, The former is a declaration; the latter could just be blowing off steam to a confidant. In other reports, Clanton is said to have sent racist texts, plural. There was only one (I’ve seen the screenshot.)

Well, never mind: the idea is to make Clanton look like a racist.

ATL is part of a larger effort to damage Clanton: another hit piece appears in Mediate—which I no longer use because of articles like that one—using Clanton to impugn Ginni Thomas, the Supreme Court Justice’s wife. The 2018 article states that Thomas hired a staffer—Clanton— “known for saying” “I hate black people.” The idea is that Thomas is a racist because she hired a racist—though, oddly, Ginni is married to a black man. (That’s Ginni with Crystal above) Ruining Clanton’s reputation is just a means to an end. In a neat example of unethical journalistic tag-teaming, Rubino links to the Mediaite article which relied on the same New Yorker piece she does, saying there were “more reports of bigoted comments from Clanton”…in other words, people saying Clanton said something.

It’s like the January 6 Commission hearings!

After working for Clarence Thomas’s wife the racist (and apparently became friends with the Justice as well) Clanton went to law school, described by Rubino as “ASSLaw — otherwise known as George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, for the uninitiated.” Classy. ATL hated Justice Scalia, of course. After graduating, Crystal was hired as a law clerk by Judge Corey Maze of the Northern District of Alabama and Eleventh Circuit Judge William Pryor.

This, thanks to the intense efforts by Above the Law, Mediaite and others in the cabal, sparked a judicial investigation, presumably on the grouds of creating an appearance of bias. In January of this year, the Judicial Council of the Second Circuit found that Judge Corey Maze of the Northern District of Alabama and Eleventh Circuit Judge William Pryor did not commit judicial misconduct when they hired Clanton as a law clerk. The judges had been aware of the text message story, but after speaking with her and her references, decided that the episode was unsubstantiated.

But Democrats on the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee wanted the investigation to continue—of course they did, for both judges are Republican appointees. A seven-member panel of federal judges—Democrats, mostly—held that Maze and Pryor couldn’t be cleared of misconduct without a special committee examining the allegations. So now there’s a “special committee.”

Above the Law has now published six posts about Clanton. She has turned into a serviceable weapon to attack several favorite ATL and progressive media targets, and if her career is derailed, well, it’s for a good cause, or she deserves it, or the ends justify the means, or, probably all three, in Rubino’s hate-filled, rationalization-driven mind. After all, Clanton once may have sent an offensive text message. She has to be destroyed.

Would I hire a law clerk who had Clanton’s rumored-to-be-dirty laundry? If I spoke with her, did sufficient checking and was convinced that she had been unfairly branded as a racist, I hope so. It would take courage: in her article, Rubino slyly implies that Maze and Pryor might be racists just like their clerk. Of course it would be easier to just shun Clanton; Rubino and Above the Law will surely impugn any law firm, government agency or company that hires her too.

The Left’s cancel culture demands that a single impulsive, emotional, ill-considered tweet, text message or social media post, regardless of the context or circumstances, is justification for destroying a life. In Rubino’s extra-vicious mutation of this already unethical principle, even allegations of such communications should be sufficient, especially if the collateral damage might include big game on the Left’s kill list.

One thought on “Ethics Dunces: Kathryn Rubino, And, As Usual, “Above The Law”

  1. Jack wrote, “The Left’s cancel culture demands that a single impulsive, emotional, ill-considered tweet, text message or social media post, regardless of the context or circumstances, is justification for destroying a life. In Rubino’s extra-vicious mutation of this already unethical principle, even allegations of such communications should be sufficient, especially if the collateral damage might include big game on the Left’s kill list.”

    Isn’t this kind of outright persecution reasonable evidence of Borg like hive-minded totalitarian thinking.

    Those that have not appropriately kowtowed and fully assimilated will be destroyed.

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