Ethics Hero: Police Officer Robin Parker

The ethical way to take your medicine.

Officer Robin Parker, a Maine state police officer, was pulled over for drunk driving while off-duty and arrested, as he should have been, but as many officers in similar circumstances are not, due to “professional courtesy.”  Parker was put on administrative leave pending an investigation. His arrest was beginning to cause discord at the station, as some of Parker’s colleagues but some of his fellow officers were ostracizing the officers who arrested him.

Parker sent a mass email to all the officers. It read…

Dear Fellow Troopers,

I’m not sure I’m able to articulate exactly how I feel,  but I will try to put into words my thoughts.

Most if not all of you know by now what happened with me last Sunday evening. I was pulled over on the turnpike for suspicion of driving under the influence. I was subsequently processed and charged with that offense by Troopers within Troop G.

 I want to first thank all of you for your tremendous support and prayers. I will continue to graciously accept them as I move forward in this process. One thing I want to make perfectly clear to everyone. My decisions and choices were mine and mine alone. I have made some mistakes and I’m prepared to answer for them. I appreciate the kind words expressing sadness that I will have to deal with this in the courts and within the department. But these are the consequences for MY ACTIONS. I’m not saying this is not painful, because it is. I’m not saying this is not going to be hard, because it will be. I’m not saying I’m not ashamed and embarrassed, because I am. But, what I am saying is I own this and I’m prepared for the consequences.

 I apologize to all of you from the SP cadets that I just graduated from the BLETP to Colonel Williams. I have embarrassed myself and tarnished not only my reputation but that of the Maine State Police, an organization I wanted to be a part of since I was a young boy. The thought of having brought discredit to the organization that I love so much is hard to bear. What I have done to my family, friends, and our State Police Family has saddened me deeply.

There is one other thing that has saddened me, and that is what I’m hearing around the department. I understand there are many who are very upset that I was processed by our own and perhaps not “treated differently”. Although this anger may stem from a respect and appreciation for me as a person and trooper, it is not healthy.

Let me first say that the Troopers who dealt with me were professionals that we all strive to be, what we expect from the cadets at the academy and teach them to be like when on the road. I could tell throughout the process that they took no pleasure in doing what they had to do. For them I want to apologize for putting them and their supervisor in that position. They showed COMPASSION, EXCELLENCE, INTEGRITY, & FAIRNESS. This is what we ask and this is what was done. Remember that I was the cause and I am responsible for my own actions.

So, If I could ask for one thing out of all of this: Please allow this to pass with no more anger and resentment. Show those involved and had to make difficult decisions that same love and compassion you have shown me. We have a Command Staff that we all feel can lead us and a direction the State Police is going in is positive. I feel bad enough knowing what I have done. If I thought that any discourse or division within the State Police occurred because of my actions It would be difficult for me to live with. I have no resentment towards these men and I ask that you don’t either. We don’t need this to effect morale and the camaraderie we have amongst ourselves.

I apologize for the rambling but it has been difficult to sort my thoughts and put to pen.

One last thing, Please forgive me for my actions and I hope I will have the opportunity to work with you all again and earn back your trust and respect.

Your Brother & Fellow Trooper,

 Sincerely,

Robin Parker

This is accountability, responsibility, humility and honor exemplified.

[Thanks to tgt for passing along the story]

6 thoughts on “Ethics Hero: Police Officer Robin Parker

  1. That’s the kind of integrity and responsibility we should expect and demand from any public servant. No selective enforcement of the law or double standards. I hope this officer’s compatriots heed his words.

  2. An ethics “hero”?. Hardly. He is an offender of the worst kind and there is little difference between Officer Parker and the young man who crashed into a tree killing his friends (as in another thread).
    The only difference being Parker was caught in time. Thank God he was apprehended before he did damage.
    The ethical ones in this case are the officers who apprehended him and didn’t show favour because of his status.

    • You seem to be missing the whole point of the Ethics Hero thing. It’s not a lifetime award (unless it’s an Ethics Hero Emeritus, as I awarded to, for example, Sir Edmund Hillary.). It’s for exemplifying ethical conduct in a specific instance. The officer did not have to come to the support of those who arrested him…many in his position would agree with the ostracizers. He’s not a hero for driving drunk…indeed, for a police officer to do that is worse than for a private citizen. But the article was clear that he wasn’t being praised for the DUI.

      Try to keep up, huh?

      • Also, it’s not uncommon for Jack to confer Ethics Hero status on people that he openly dislikes if they do good deeds, like John Kerry and Bill Clinton.

        Reading comprehension: you should at least be able to outdo a 21 year old of only slightly above average IQ in this area.

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