Unethical Facebook Post Of The Month: The Fired KFC Employee

unethical-tweet

We can make short work of this one. The post, which is being circulated around social media with great glee, embodies an unethical impulse, breach of confidentiality, and vengeance. It is miles away from the other end of the disgruntled ex-employee spectrum, but on the spectrum nonetheless, along with taking a shotgun to one’s former office and firing away. Trying to harm an employer because you got yourself fired simply illustrates the kind of character deficits that resulted in the termination.

As with everything else in life,there is an ethical way to get fired. That would be to shake the hand of the one who handed you the pink slip, state your appreciation for the chance to work and sincere regret that it did not work out, then to say good-bye and good luck to fellow workers, then walking out with head held high. Leaving while darkly muttering “You’ll be sorry!” under your breath, or trying to harm the company’s reputation or business though retaliation later, is both unethical and stupid. Calvin better hope his ill-considered message doesn’t get into any potential employer’s hands. You’d have to be nuts to hire someone like him.

His is the not-so-secret recipe for distrust and failure.

23 Comments

Filed under Business & Commercial, Character, Ethics Alarms Award Nominee, Ethics Dunces, Facebook, Workplace

23 responses to “Unethical Facebook Post Of The Month: The Fired KFC Employee

  1. Plus he should have been fired for his inability to count to 11.

  2. Not only is he acting dishonorable, vindictive, petty, impulsive, and immature, he apparently can’t even count.

    (The eleventh one is oil. That’s a spice, right?)

    However, after looking up the recipe and its security measures on Wikipedia, I think it is likely a joke. The claimed recipe from a different source looks very different from what King posted, and the security measures in place look like they prevent any one person from knowing the recipe. Unless he was CEO or something, I doubt he had access to the full recipe.

    Nevertheless, the fact that King isn’t making it obvious that it’s a joke does go a ways towards normalizing dishonorable behavior in the public consciousness.

  3. Fred Davison

    ….and he’s probably not even close: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KFC_Original_Recipe#Recipe

    When I worked for KFC many (hundreds of) moons ago, no employee had access to the recipe. The manager had, under lock and key, emergency packets of seasonings if they ran out of premixed flour + seasonings and needed to buy flour locally, but neither the premix or seasoning packets listed the herbs and spices.

  4. Arthur in Main

    And the recipe for a martini is gin, vermouth and ice.

    Seriously, even in the (rather unlikely) chance that these are the actual ingredients, proportions are everything. And as others have noted, the idea that the chain would offer line-level employees access to a key differentiator, such as the seasoning mix, is preposterous. How many KFC employees have come and gone through the decades? If the front end had access to the company’s most important asset, it would’ve spilled long since.

    Given all of that, I see this as a bit of harmless fun – not a breach of ethics.

      • As it would be a joke if he wrote, “I spit in a customer’s sandwich before I left.” Still suggests that such revenge on an employer is funny..and since so many people do it for real, it isn’t.

        Meanwhile, what happened to the e in “Maine”?

        • Arthur in MainE

          Not THAT (meaning spit-in-sandwich), because THAT would be credible.

          And the missing “e” was to see if you were paying attention, which it appears you’re not, given the fact that I texted you more than a week ago and never heard back.

  5. pennagain

    Ah, but ze ingredients zay are nozzing, nozzing at all, without ze proportionz. Ze blague, le comédie, non! Pourquoi? Ze palate de cuisine, she is nevair KFC, non?

  6. Jeff H.

    Based on my understanding of the 11 herbs and spices… that list isn’t even right. The colonel’s recipe is safe… for now.

    If the guy really is joking, he should have made it obvious by adding nonsensical ingredients like gold flake and the blood of the innocent.

  7. THE Bill

    The funny thing is that the secret to KFC isn’t the herbs and spices. It never has been. Its the way it was cooked in a pressure fryer that allowed them to cook it quickly and to order.

  8. E2 (nee Elizabeth I)

    Whether or not the ingredients are right and might be available to a ‘line employee,’ the impulse of the one fired is the same. I well remember the basic dictum I followed as something more than a line employee and still follow to this day: If it happened on my watch or through one of my subordinates, it was my fault and I stepped up. Don’t know why this kid was fired, or at least the proximate cause, but he’s certainly making himself more unemployable than KFC deems him to be right now. Jack is right: the correct response is the handshake and gratitude for the opportunity. It may not seem like much of an opportunity now (or ever), but this kind of vindictiveness will follow him, and attitude is at least half the game in employment.

    • wllmjunior

      “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” I think this quote of JFK’s is appropriate. When a culture like ours limits, discourages, or makes meaningful redress of an employee’s issues or concerns with their employer nearly impossible, this type of unethical behavior should be expected, if not almost certain. I am not condoning or saying the behavior is right or warranted, and we don’t know the full story here. I don’t care whether one labors under a “right to work” policy or not. Employment is a mutual relationship between two parties where both need to be satisfied for the relationship to work. Employers need to quit acting like they hold all the cards and are benevolent czars. Furthermore, people/workers need to quit assuming the employees are always at fault when the doody hits the fan. The current state of workers rights in this country only encourages unethical behavior when one feels slighted or aggrieved. The employer also plays a role in these types of situations even though almost always abdicate any responsibility whatsoever when they play out poorly. Right or wrong, I always snicker a bit when an employee “sticks it to the man” because I feel sure it wasn’t totally undeserved. “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” I think this quote of JFK’s is appropriate. When a culture like ours limits, discourages, or makes meaningful redress of an employee’s issues or concerns with their employer nearly impossible, this type of unethical behavior should be expected, if not almost certain. I am not condoning or saying the behavior is right or warranted, and we don’t know the full story here. I don’t care whether one labors under a “right to work” policy or not. Employment is a mutual relationship between two parties where both need to be satisfied for the relationship to work. Employers need to quit acting like they hold all the cards and are benevolent czars. Furthermore, people/workers need to quit assuming the employees are always at fault when the doody hits the fan. The current state of workers rights in this country only encourages unethical behavior when one feels slighted or aggrieved. The employer also plays a role in these types of situations even though almost always abdicate any responsibility whatsoever when they play out poorly. Right or wrong, I always snicker a bit when an employee “sticks it to the man” because I feel sure it wasn’t totally undeserved. “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” I think this quote of JFK’s is appropriate. When a culture like ours limits, discourages, or makes meaningful redress of an employee’s issues or concerns with their employer nearly impossible, this type of unethical behavior should be expected, if not almost certain. I am not condoning or saying the behavior is right or warranted, and we don’t know the full story here. I don’t care whether one labors under a “right to work” policy or not. Employment is a mutual relationship between two parties where both need to be satisfied for the relationship to work. Employers need to quit acting like they hold all the cards and are benevolent czars. Furthermore, people/workers need to quit assuming the employees are always at fault when the doody hits the fan. The current state of workers rights in this country only encourages unethical behavior when one feels slighted or aggrieved. The employer also plays a role in these types of situations even though almost always abdicate any responsibility whatsoever when they play out poorly. Right or wrong, I always snicker a bit when an employee “sticks it to the man” because I feel sure it wasn’t totally undeserved.

  9. William A. Harris, Jr.

    “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” I think this quote of JFK’s is appropriate. When a culture like ours limits, discourages, or makes meaningful redress of an employee’s issues or concerns with their employer nearly impossible, this type of unethical behavior should be expected, if not almost certain. I am not condoning or saying the behavior is right or warranted, and we don’t know the full story here. I don’t care whether one labors under a “right to work” policy or not. Employment is a mutual relationship between two parties where both need to be satisfied for the relationship to work. Employers need to quit acting like they hold all the cards and are benevolent czars. Furthermore, people/workers need to quit assuming the employees are always at fault when the doody hits the fan. The current state of workers rights in this country only encourages unethical behavior when one feels slighted or aggrieved. The employer also plays a role in these types of situations even though almost always abdicate any responsibility whatsoever when they play out poorly. Right or wrong, I always snicker a bit when an employee “sticks it to the man” because I feel sure it wasn’t totally undeserved.

  10. wllmjunior

    I apologize for the redundancy. I am not sure what happened with my post.

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