Ethics Dunce: The NAACP. A Really Bad One…

The NAACP, once a heroic and invaluable champion of civil rights, has apparently completed its devolution into a hyper-partisan, race-baiting collection of venal, divisive  hacks. It has been said that every cause inevitably becomes a racket, and the NAACP is now a prime and tragic example.

How do we know this? We know this because the organization has called the decision (finally) by Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones to command his player to stick to what they are paid for—football and only football—when they are on the playing field, and to stand for the National Anthem “a public commitment by an NFL owner to violate his players’ Constitutional right to free speech.”

This is more than merely ignorant, though if genuine the statement would be unforgivably ignorant for a civil rights organization: a civil rights organization that doesn’t know what civil rights are and what the Bill of Rights means is useless as well as without credibility.

That, however, is impossible. The NAACP has lawyers; their lawyers aren’t idiots. They know that the First Amendment has no relevance or connection to the silly NFL players’ kneeling stunt during the National Anthem. The lawyers had to have informed the NAACP leadership of this, as if that was necessary, which it almost certainly was not. The leadership has to know better than to make this junior high school level civics mistake. No, in this case the NAACP is lying. It is deliberately misinforming the people who depend on it to lead on civil rights, and who trust the organization to be able to support its position with facts and law. It is doing this to inflame passions and worsen the racial divide. What other reason could there be?

For the record—I am sure you know this, just as I am sure that the NAACP knows it, because knowing the Constitution is its business—any employer can dictate what kind of conduct, including political speech, can and cannot take place in the workplace. The First Amendment does not protect protests on the job, not does it proscribe the actions of private employers. The First Amendment prohibits government action against free speech. The Dallas Cowboys is not the government. The NFL is not the government.

Do you really think the NAACP doesn’t know all this?

Of course it does. It is lying. It is intentionally misleading its followers. It is betraying its legacy and mission.

That’s considerably worse than  ignorance.

31 Comments

Filed under "bias makes you stupid", Character, Ethics Alarms Award Nominee, Ethics Dunces, Ethics Train Wrecks, Government & Politics, Leadership, Race, Rights

31 responses to “Ethics Dunce: The NAACP. A Really Bad One…

  1. cathammer

    Further proof that, just like its antiquated name, the NAACP has long since moved into the realm of irrelevancy. Does that confirm the NRA as the nation’s premier civil rights organization?

  2. Glenn Logan

    Speaking of the NAACP, can anyone explain to me how it makes sense to file a lawsuit alleging the Department of Census won’t do enough to make sure African-Americans are counted in 2020, because Trump or something:

    On Thursday, the NAACP filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging the Commerce Department, which oversees the Census Bureau, is “unlawfully withholding” information about its plans for the 2020 Census, especially regarding how it will get the word out to minority and low-income communities.

    I’m sorry, did I accidentally sniff some glue, or is the NAACP actually saying that the Census Department needs to work harder to count black folks than white? Because that’s how this reads to me.

    Perhaps it’s my inadequate rearing and education, but I always imagined it was the individual’s responsibility to take a mailed census form and return it completed. Perhaps this would be a problem for those without a home, and arguably the NAACP might have a point in that case, but black people wouldn’t be the only ones affected (although they may be disproportionately represented in that population).

    But “getting the word out” to minority communities is not the responsibility of the Department of Census, it’s the responsibility of Americans of all ethnicities, religions, etc. to take charge of their own lives and execute their duties under U.S. law. It isn’t as if the census is some kind of mystery that requires a master’s degree to accomplish.

    Evidently, the NAACP understands the Constitution well enough to know the impact the census can have on it. Yet somehow, the limitation of the First Amendment to government action seems to have escaped them utterly.

  3. Steve-O-in-NJ

    The NAACP isn’t really a civil rights organization and hasn’t been for some time now. It’s a black advocacy organization with an agenda to push forward, just like the ACLU is mostly a liberal advocacy organization, which will advocate for all of the Bill of Rights except the Second Amendment.

    • Glenn Logan

      It’d be way to much for them to advocate for the whole Bill of Rights, but is it really too much for them to at least give lip service to understanding the very first one?

  4. The NAACP is “Breitbarting” (snookering) its base.

    I wonder why they haven’t extolled Michael Wilbon (for whom I lost a little respect) when he slobbered the Cowboys have a “Plantation-like environment” on ESPN’s “Pardon The Interruption” on Monday.

    Comparing the coddled trappings of an NFL team, especially Jones’ Cowboys, to a plantation exhibits irredeemable imbecilic stupidity.

    • Glenn Logan

      You have more than a little respect for Michael Wilbon?

      Okay, but … ugh.

      • Wilbon knows sports yet has a racial animus ax to grind, I can separate the wheat from the chafe (sic).

        • The plantation line is so brain-meltingly stupid and flagrant race-baiting that it should earn permanent disrespect. Last I heard, plantation owners paid their slaves nothing, and they couldn’t quit if they wanted to. Football players are paid millions. End of analogy. Verdict: moron.

        • Glenn Logan

          I was a lead sports blogger for eight years. My opinion of Wilbon includes what you call the wheat, of which there is precious little in my mind.

          But to each, their own.

      • Other Bill

        Paul, I’ve long considered college football and basketball as plantations. Huge numbers of poor black kids working for free as literally field hands. Highly compensated white coaches as overseers out in the fields. And white athletic directors and university presidents and trustees as plantation owners. It’s a perfectly apt metaphor.

        Pro basketball and football are different to the extent the players get paid. And in many cases they get paid handsomely. But the owners are predominantly white (to put it mildly) and they’re also predominantly Jewish. I wouldn’t be surprised to see some sort of outright rebellion at some point by the black players. The situation is just too fraught right now. And I bet the owners are absolutely terrified to the point of mortification that something like that could happen. I’d love to be a fly on the wall in a conference room during a conference call among NFL or NBA owners about what the heck to do to keep fans happy and paying and players playing.

        • Glenn Logan

          Paul, I’ve long considered college football and basketball as plantations. Huge numbers of poor black kids working for free as literally field hands.

          With respect, this analogy is poor. The young men want to be there, some for the opportunity to play in the NFL and some for the education, but the first priority of all of them is to play the game they love.

          All of them are paid in-kind for their efforts, including a free education, free medical care of the highest order, free transportation to and from games, and many free opportunities to travel on the school’s dime for community service projects.

          The real question isn’t whether or not they are compensated, it’s whether or not they are compensated enough. That’s a debate beyond the scope of this comment, and too far astray from the topic at hand.

        • Something tells me I’m holding my hands back and begging to get pasted, but here goes.

          I’m no apologist for the system, and we likely agree here more than not, I’ve long railed about the hypocrisy of the “one-n-done’ rule for NCAA men’s BB.

          “I’ve long considered college football and basketball as plantations.”

          Point taken, but that diminishes the sufferings of true plantation residents in much the same way that referring to Climate Skeptics as “Deniers” is horrendously insulting to former residents of Concentration Camps.

          “Huge numbers of poor black kids working for free as literally field hands.”

          Respectfully, I believe you’re off by several orders of magnitude. You may make the case that there are similarities, but if given the choice, which would you rather be?

          Their “labor” enriches far too few rent-seekers (NCAA FB Bowl Chairman compensation??), and there’s a HELLUVA a lot more room to create a more equitable arrangement.

          Absent a ‘farm system’ system, (which I favor) what are the alternatives for some of these kids? And overlooked is that “income sports” provide opportunities (finance) all non-revenue athletics and their participants.

          If you haven’t seen it, give “Schooled: The Price Of College Sports” a watch; a real eye opener!

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schooled:_The_Price_of_College_Sports

        • Mark Putnam

          I read(misread?) somewhere that Jack Marshall isn’t white but Greek. Is this accurate? Are the “predominantly Jewish” owners of pro-ball teams white? I was under the impression that Jewish(other than through conversion) would not actually be white.

  5. Other Bill

    “The NFL is not the government.”

    That brought a smile to my face. I remember watching my first football games on TV in the lat ’50s and early ’60s and being in third grade or so and thinking the National Football League, with its name and it’s American flag “shield” WAS a government run enterprise. I guess by the time the USFL came along (with Donald Trump), I’d figured it out.

    If you’re in the divisiveness business, I guess sometimes private industry is bad and the government is good and other times private industry is like the government and therefore bad. It’s just a little hard to keep score these days.

  6. “Headline Of The Day” from the MFNS (Middle Finger News Service):

    NFL: “No one could damage an industry better then us.

    Hollywood: “Hold my beer

    http://www.diogenesmiddlefinger.com/2017/10/nfl-no-one-could-damage-industry-better.html

  7. Chris marschner

    Why hasn’t the Constitutional lawyer and former President weighed in to correct this misconception. His silence speaks volumes.

    • ”His silence speaks volumes.”

      Cheap Shot!! He’s otherwise occupied figuring out how to…um…creatively return all of Harvey Weinstein’s bundled donations.

      A silver lining? He couldn’t possibly top (bottom?) HRC’s staggeringly hypocritical approach: making the return of her Weinstein donations a part of her yearly 10 % tithing.

      Even money says it ALL makes its way to the Clinton Foundation.

    • Barack Obama would no more criticize the NAACP than tunnel to China using a spoon. No matter what the organization did or said. I think that’s a fair statement.

  8. NAACP ignores the actual meaning of the United States Constitution and jumps on the social justice warrior’s faux interpretation of the Constitution and people are surprised?

    This was inevitable.

  9. Chris

    While firing players for refusing to stand for the anthem is not a Constitutional violation, it certainly goes against the spirit of free speech. Employers should not be encouraged to compel their employees to engage in political speech such as standing for the anthem.

  10. I think we can all see where this crap is heading; all things patriotic will be condemned as racist and therefore evil and all things deemed as “protesting” said evil by social justice warriors will be deemed as pure as the new driven snow.

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