KABOOM! A New York Times Front Page Story Suggests Ethics Is Dead, Logic Is Dead, And That I’m Wasting My Life…

July 7th’s front page story in the New York Times not only made my head explode, it has me considering whether to chuck it all and become a bottle cap collector or something else more useful than trying to promote ethics awareness in a society where its most respected newspaper publishes something like this. Or maybe I should just give up entirely and flush myself down the commode.

The headline online is  “When ‘Black Lives Matter’ Is Invoked in the Abortion Debate.”  It just as well might have been: “TWSXQ@$#7mm.”

I’ll just post and comment on some of the gems in the piece, then you read the whole  thing and meet me at the top of the ROLAIDS tower in Baltimore and we’ll jump together, holding hands and singing the Pina Colada Song.

  • “As a pastor, Clinton Stancil counsels his black congregants that abortion is akin to the taking of innocent life. But as a civil rights activist, Mr. Stancil urges them to understand the social forces that prompt black women to have abortions at disproportionately high rates.”

If the good pastor believes that abortion is the taking of innocent life, the “social forces” don’t excuse the act at all. This is like saying that we should “understand” what makes serial killers kill. Murder—taking of innocent life–is an absolute wrong; nothing can excuse it. This is equivocation.

  • “But to many African-Americans like Mr. Stancil, who is the pastor of Wayman A.M.E. Church in St. Louis, abortion cannot be debated without considering the quality of urban schools. Or the disproportionately high unemployment rate in black communities. Or the significant racial disparities in health care.”

Then many urban schools are graduating African-Americans like Pastor Stancil who have the reasoning ability of household appliances and believe that taking innocent lives can be justified or rationalized by irrelevant matters.

  • “As much as I believe with all my heart about the killing, the taking of innocent lives, I also believe that I will never support giving white legislators who have no interest in our community the ability to tell our women what they can do with their bodies,” Mr. Stancil said of sweeping abortion restrictions recently approved in Missouri.”

Rev. Stancil is a racist then. He also believes that it isn’t the ethical and moral principles embodied in a law, but the race of the legislators who pass a law that matters.

  • “In many black communities, the abortion debate is inextricably tied to race in ways that white communities seldom confront. Social and economic disparities that are particularly challenging to African-Americans, from mass incarceration to maternal and infant mortality, are crucial parts of that discussion.”

A classic. I especially like how mass incarceration is used as if some force of nature is sweeping up innocent African Americans and locking them up in prison for no reason whatsoever. The cause of mass incarceration is that too many African Americans break laws and commit felonies, and their community continues to do a incompetent job ofdiscouraging the conduct or being accountable for it. Getting pregnant without a husband or sufficient financial stability to support a child is the immediate cause of abortions in the black community, and the obvious remedy is not getting pregnant.

Black women commit what Pastor Stancil considers the taking innocent life to avoid infant mortality?

Brilliant.

  • “Those who are most vocal about abortion and abortion laws are my white brothers and sisters, and yet many of them don’t care about the plight of the poor, the plight of the immigrant, the plight of African-Americans,” said the Rev. Dr. Luke Bobo, a minister from Kansas City, Mo., who is vehemently opposed to abortion. “My argument here is, let’s think about the entire life span of the person.”

Now there’s a powerful, coherent argument backed up with facts rather than flagrant bias,  supposition, and rationalizations!

  • “Religious teachings may have convinced some African-Americans that life begins in the womb. But having seen firsthand how their communities have been hurt by high incarceration rates, economic disinvestment and a lack of educational opportunities, some have a hard time embracing what they see as one-size-fits-all abortion bans.”

Let’s see: the thinking being attributed to the African-American community is “Heck, too many of our community members are being convicted of crimes and sent to jail, and we’re getting fewer hand-outs, and our high school drop-out rates are high and affirmative action for college is on the way out—so i guess we need to abort more fetuses, even though we believe with all our hearts that they are all innocent human life.”

Does that make sense to the writer? He doesn’t hint that it doesn’t. Does it make sense to anyone else?

  • “Mr. Stancil of the Wayman A.M.E. Church said his view that abortion amounted to ending a life was compatible with his belief in a woman’s choice because God was the ultimate judge.”

No, those beliefs are not compatible, and “God is the ultimate judge” is the ultimate cop-out.

Enough. What the Times article seems to be telling us is that not only are the persistent problems in the black community the fault of “uncaring whites,” the high abortion rate in the African-American community is , by extension, the fault of white America as well, and the Mobius-strip pretzeling of logic and ethics required to reach that  comforting conclusion is uncritically accepted by the New York Times.

 

23 thoughts on “KABOOM! A New York Times Front Page Story Suggests Ethics Is Dead, Logic Is Dead, And That I’m Wasting My Life…

  1. I have to wonder if this flailing verbally is trying to reconcile the religious general disapproval of abortion with progressive saying anything to insult conservative beliefs? Of course it will sound like garbage, because you can’t espouse two political extremes at once…

  2. I get it. I fully support laws against animal cruelty although I drown kitties on the weekend because hey, God’s the ultimate judge!

      • A large part of the problem is the misunderstanding of The LORD’s role as judge. He does not judge the way we think. He does not weigh credits and demerits in a balance. He simply condemns. The judgment of The LORD is something to avoid, not invite.

        Also folks who say ‘only God can judge me’ live as if He won’t.

        • “He does not weigh credits and demerits in a balance.”

          We don’t judge the law this way either. I can built 1000 bridges connecting 1000 communities and bringing commerce and cultural interaction to them all and be known as Michael the Bridge-Builder, who improved the lives of hundreds of thousands. But if I steal $500 dollars of merchandise, I’m still going to jail for theft.

          You are correct, however, in the assessment that the exhortation of “God is the ultimate judge” should be an individual motivator to not sin, NOT a societal prohibition on judgment.

  3. Pastor Clinton Stancil morals seem to be in severe conflict and it’s easy to attribute the source of that conflict directly to racism. This pastor needs to have his irrational racist soap box yanked out from under him, but I’m guessing the people that sit in his church are just a stupid as he is.

    To a racist everything is about race.

    • I’ve said for a long time that the definition of a racist is anyone who thinks race is important.

      –Dwayne

  4. If you work in the criminal justice system, you hear similar rationalizations all the time. Defendants will say, ” I know I shouldn’t have (robbed, stolen, etc.), but how else was I supposed to buy my drugs?” I had one burglar tell me,” I had to steal some things to pawn so I could pay my child support.” Nice that such rationalizations now apply to murdering babies.
    The contention that “God is the ultimate judge” is correct, but God has already communicated to us that murder is bad; one of the “thou shalt nots,” as a matter of fact. So it isn’t hard to predict how God will judge when his turn comes. Of course, rejection of God’s authority ultimately leaves a vacuum that is almost always filled by “every man doing what is right in his own eyes.”
    The world is not ripening toward perfection.

  5. If the good pastor believes that abortion is the taking of innocent life, the “social forces” don’t excuse the act at all. This is like saying that we should “understand” what makes serial killers kill. Murder—taking of innocent life–is an absolute wrong; nothing can excuse it. This is equivocation.

    Or the social forces that prompt creepy incels to rape young girls.

    Or the social forces that allegedly prompted Jeff Epstein to rape young girls.

    Or the social forces that prompted Jerry Sandusky to rape young boys.

    A classic. I especially like how mass incarceration is used as if some force of nature is sweeping up innocent African Americans and locking them up in prison for no reason whatsoever. The cause of mass incarceration is that too many African Americans break laws and commit felonies, and their community continues to do a incompetent job ofdiscouraging the conduct or being accountable for it. Getting pregnant without a husband or sufficient financial stability to support a child is the immediate cause of abortions in the black community, and the obvious remedy is not getting pregnant.

    And yet, too many who complain about mass incarceration also support stricter “common sense, “sensible” gun legislation- which will put even more people in prison.

    “Those who are most vocal about abortion and abortion laws are my white brothers and sisters, and yet many of them don’t care about the plight of the poor, the plight of the immigrant, the plight of African-Americans,” said the Rev. Dr. Luke Bobo, a minister from Kansas City, Mo., who is vehemently opposed to abortion. “My argument here is, let’s think about the entire life span of the person.”

    Now there’s a powerful, coherent argument backed up with facts rather than flagrant bias, supposition, and rationalizations!

    I have heard and read this kind of argument for twenty years.

    Please elaborate. What are the fallacies of this argument?

    Why do these fallacies persist?

  6. This article is a perfect example of Vaclav Havel’s essay on evasive thinking. Here the Times writer is attempting to argue that an unhealthy, band aid style approach, is the correct (woke) way to deal with a massively unhealthy situation. It reminds me of the “we have to do something,” and “it’s not so bad,” style of unethical rationalizations.

    Havel’s example was an article that discussed the situation of windows coming loose and falling out (due to shoddy work from employment by the state) and people dying as a result. The article’s author then turned the piece into an ideological argument for the progress of Czech socialism because some of those windows displayed the latest Parisian fashions.

    Here the times writer found pastors who affirm leftist dialectical patterns while having supposed spiritual authority, to argue abortion is good for blacks because of “social forces” that render “disproportionately high rates” of abortion.

    Say what?

    The pitch here is to keep abortion among blacks high because racism makes them have to have abortions. Like the Havel window example, ideology is used to avoid meaningfully addressing the root cause of the problem. Instead we get pretty virtue signaling phrases like “mass incarceration,” “economic disinvestment,” and “racial disparities.” This “verbal mysticism,” as Havel called it, keeps potentially better (and less eugenic) solutions out of the readers reach.

    Margaret Sanger was also good at recruiting black pastors to push forward an agenda that ultimately hurts blacks more than it helps, so this tactic isn’t new. But at the end of the day “you can’t polish a turd” no matter how many times the words “progress” and “equity” are thrown out. If we want to see fewer abortions for blacks, the key will be first for blacks to stop listening to those who encourage their demise.

    • I believe if you want to reduce abortions the pro life people should say “OK you win we will promote killing babies of poor women so their will be less stress on poor women. Now, where do you want us to bild the baby killing factories?”

  7. “As a pastor, Clinton Stancil counsels his black congregants that abortion is akin to the taking of innocent life. But as a civil rights activist, Mr. Stancil urges them to understand the social forces that prompt black women to have abortions at disproportionately high rates.”

    A good pastor DOES acknowledge SINFUL conduct while counseling patience towards sinners.

    His stance on this is NOT contradictory, unless there is more to his stance than being alluded to.

    I understand why some thieves feel they have to steal, while condemning their thievery.

      • If the reporter has accurately conveyed the Pastor’s message, then these two sentences are NOT a rationalization. The claim is “Abortion is a Sin. Have patience for the sinners who, while wrong, are making their wrong decisions amidst a flood of non-ethical considerations.”

        He hasn’t rationalized abortion.

        He goes on later to do so, but those statements are not.

  8. “But to many African-Americans like Mr. Stancil, who is the pastor of Wayman A.M.E. Church in St. Louis, abortion cannot be debated without considering the quality of urban schools. Or the disproportionately high unemployment rate in black communities. Or the significant racial disparities in health care.”

    Is it not fair to consider, while people behave unethically, the unethical considerations and improperly taught value-sets that they those unethical people use to guide their unethical decisions?

    African Americans do suffer from really really crappy acculturation from a variety of angles (many of which are left-wing institutions) which DO make it easier to make really unethical choices, such as killing one’s children.

  9. “As much as I believe with all my heart about the killing, the taking of innocent lives, I also believe that I will never support giving white legislators who have no interest in our community the ability to tell our women what they can do with their bodies,” Mr. Stancil said of sweeping abortion restrictions recently approved in Missouri.”

    Now he’s off. When a community is so broken that it’s institutions like family and school cannot teach values, law has to step in.

  10. “In many black communities, the abortion debate is inextricably tied to race in ways that white communities seldom confront. Social and economic disparities that are particularly challenging to African-Americans, from mass incarceration to maternal and infant mortality, are crucial parts of that discussion.”

    Boy isn’t that true, though maybe not like he expected.

    Abortion, early on, was eagerly seen by progressives as a way to limit and decrease the African American population as progressives saw Africans as less useful or less contributive to society.

  11. “…in a society where its most respected newspaper publishes something like this.”

    To be fair, “most respected newspaper” is a superlative akin to “tastiest item on the Jack-In-The-Box menu” or “fastest snail”…

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