I Hereby Solemnly Pledge, With My Hand On My 1967 Boston Red Sox Yearbook Turned To The Photo Of Tony Conigliaro, That I Will Vote For All African-American Politicians, Regardless Of Policies Or Party, Who Declare That They Will Not Exploit Racial Divisions, And Will Never Blame Criticism, Justified Or Not, On The “Racism” Of Their Critics

That politician would not be new New York Mayor Eric Adams.

Adams yesterday ranted at reporters for not being sufficiently laudatory regarding his performance so far in his still-young term. “If you want to acknowledge or not, I have been doing a darn good job and we just can’t live in this alternate reality,” Adams fumed. To what does the Democrat attribute what he says is this lack of appreciation? Of course!

“I’m a black man that’s the mayor but my story is being interpreted by people that don’t look like me. How many blacks are on editorial boards? How many blacks determine how these stories are being written? How many Asians? How many East Asians? How many South Asians? Everyone talks about my government being diversified, what’s the diversification in the newsrooms? Diversify your newsrooms so I can look out and see people who look like me.”

This sort of complaint, if the kinds of people who make it thought it through, assumes that all people and professionals base their analyses of good, bad, right, wrong, smart, foolish, competent and incompetent on the race and ethnic background of the one responsible for the conduct. In other words, Adams is announcing that he not only expects people to be bigots, but when they match his skin shade, wantst them to be.

In fact, Adams has not been doing such a “darn good job.” He began by announcing that he would keep Bill de Blasio’s constitutionally dubious vaccine mandate for private employers. Then he announced that he was hiring his  brother to head his security detail at a $210,000 salary, and a likely criminal as a deputy mayor. Adams cemented the conclusion that he didn’t understand the ethical limits on his use of power when he announced that he would force students to be vegans once a week.

Adams would be getting criticized if he were polka-dot and all the newsrooms looked like a merger of the NBA,  the WBA, the cast of “Living Single” and a Cedric the Entertainer family reunion.

I’m serious about that pledge, you know. And to Tony C., who died this month 32 years ago, I’ll never forget you. And I’m so, so sorry that your life worked out the way it did..

12 thoughts on “I Hereby Solemnly Pledge, With My Hand On My 1967 Boston Red Sox Yearbook Turned To The Photo Of Tony Conigliaro, That I Will Vote For All African-American Politicians, Regardless Of Policies Or Party, Who Declare That They Will Not Exploit Racial Divisions, And Will Never Blame Criticism, Justified Or Not, On The “Racism” Of Their Critics

  1. Isn’t this a tactic the mayor of Chicago deployed? Didn’t Lori LIghtfoot announce she was only going to speak to reporters of color? Must be a new talking point.

  2. While I’m disgusted with all the dysfunctional politics, I happily remembered my beloved Red Sox – esp that fab team with Carl Yastrzemski, Rico Petrocelli, and of course Tony Conigliaro! Thanks Jack!

    • No doubt you recall in “Fever Pitch” that maniac Sox fan Jimmy Fallon gently applies a kiss from his hand to a photo of Tony C. at the start of the film. A gentle in-reference for Sox fans that was much appreciated.

        • It has some great moments, and accurately portrays the outer fringes of Red Sox Nation. The assumption of the film was the Red Sox were once again going to fail at the last moment as they tried to win their first World Championship since 1918, but the Sox loused them up by winning it all in 2004, so the ending happier than planned.

  3. Reading that statement put me in mind, by way of contrast, of a statement by St. Paul: “I become all things to all people so that by all means I might save some (1 Cor 9:22).” When do people look the best, attract the most, get people motivated to listen to them? I believe the answer is when they leave themselves behind and reach out to those with whom they are trying to convince. Effectively Adams is saying, “change yourselves to suit me” instead of rephrasing his message to suit his audience, which is the exact opposite.

    Of course, it is hard to reach out when you’re completely focused inward on your own desires, hurts, frustrations, and intentions. But that inward focus is infantile. Somewhere along the way we’re supposed to learn to look outwards. Maybe that’s the biggest issue we’re facing in society right now, the infantilization of adulthood. However, it seems to me that evidence from the world around us should suggest that effective politics starts by listening, not by telling, and then crafting the response based upon what is heard. That doesn’t mean waffle with every different opinion you come across, but adapt how you present your message based upon each opinion.

    But then, crying “racist!” and expecting that to end all objections is a lot easier. And it certainly helps make the enemies you expect people to be.

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