Good!

Carney

Breaking news:

Jay Carney has resigned as Presidential spokesman.

Observations:

  • It would be nice if the reason stated was that he had lost all credibility by virtue of his evasive, deceitful, and often flat-out dishonest answers to the press. Of course, that won’t be the case.
  • Is he the most dishonest press secretary ever? That’s hard to say. Would it be possible for one to be more dishonest?
  • I knew Ron Ziegler, the much-maligned press secretary through much of the Nixon administration. I would trust Ron before I would trust Jay, who would have been a perfect fit for Tricky Dick.
  • PresumablyCarney has a job lined up. Who would trust this guy, who was accurately described as a paid liar? I wouldn’t believe a thing he wrote or said. Nor would I hire him even if he personally was an honest individual. An honest individual who nonetheless lies and deceives the American public to keep his job has no integrity, and is a coward as well.
  • Yeah, it’s a tough job. So is hit man.

Everyone says Jay Carney is a hell of a nice guy. There are a lot of nice guys I wouldn’t trust, and he’s one of them.

Good riddance.

 PS: I wrote this a year ago.

 

 

 

36 thoughts on “Good!

  1. Hurray! Though I have no faith in whoever is his replacement. I did hear that the new guy “dates” with Obama from his first Iowa caucus, so can only assume he’ll be as much of a sycophant as Carney was… Replacing one with another just like him is really not cause for celebration, and I think that’s where we’ll be.

  2. PresumablyCarney has a job lined up. Who would trust this guy, who was accurately described as a paid liar? I wouldn’t believe a thing he wrote or said. Nor would I hire him even if he personally was an honest individual. An honest individual who nonetheless lies and deceives the American public to keep his job has no integrity, and is a coward as well.
    ***********
    Exactly right.
    Adios, Sock Puppet.

  3. @Scott Jacobs, most presidential press secretaries only last a year or two. It’s a terrible job. I’ve little doubt that Carney had had more than enough of it. In addition to the ridiculous hours, getting up there every day and proving to the world that he had no integrity had to wear on him – even in a room full of sympathetic rumpswabs like the White House Press Corps.

    I’m sure he’ll do just fine going forward. Dollars to donuts he’ll either end up with a high-priced senior level gig on K street, or in the Government Affairs department of one of the mega PR firms. He won’t need to work as a spokesperson himself any more; all he’ll need to do is concoct strategy and message points for an hourly rate well in excess of what most successful attorneys make..

    • getting up there every day and proving to the world that he had no integrity had to wear on him –
      ***********
      He’s probably got a stomach ulcer the size of Texas.

      • Moot argument, Jack. My bet is that neither of us will ever make enough money to be able to afford such a firm anyway. ;->

    • Scott, you are entirely correct in your description of the press secretary’s job. But: how in the world do Presidents find people to take the position? If a guy is so unschooled in the nature of the working conditions the job entails that he’ll jump at the chance and say sure, who’d want him as press secretary? If he does know, what arguments are employed to get him to accept anyway? Blackmail? (If that last, I figure it would have to involve dead hookers, at the least.) Masochism? Otherwise smart people who nevertheless made a really dumb choice? It’s a wonderment.

      • Karl, it’s not hard to find people to take the job. This is an area with which I have much experience (although certainly not in upper-level government). I can assure you that NO president would have a gig like this vacant for long.

        Let’s start with the fact that when it comes to being a spokesman for a major organization – a prestigious assignment in ANY field – serving as a press secretary for the president of the United States is the most prestigious assignment IN THE WORLD. That, alone, would attract many.

        Let’s not overlook the power this job offers – both in real time and in the future. Those who have served as presidential press secretaries can and generally do move on to powerful and lucrative careers with media (think George Stephanopolous), communications consulting (think Ari Fleischer, who I personally think was brilliant in the job) or industry (think Dana Perino, who carries a lot of clout at Random House in addition to doing talk radio and working as a talking head, and Jake Siewart, who does quite nicely with Goldman Sachs.

        There are numerous other examples, Scott McLellan notwithstanding – after his woeful stint on the job and his subsequent kiss-and-tell book, he now works as head flack for Seattle University. But it’s safe to assume he’ll never wonder where his next meal is coming from.

        Most presidential press secretaries – of the modern era, at least – are fairly young. Marlin Fitzwater, who worked for Reagan and George HW Bush, was the oldest of modern-era press secretaries, taking the job at age 47.

        Now, no one who accepts that job doesn’t understand the pressures that come with it – the time pressures, and the need to toe the “company line.” One would hope that they bring a fair amount of integrity to the job, and are willing to back away from it if their values are compromised by its demands. As with high-level players in ANY field, however, that doesn’t always happen.

        It certainly didn’t happen with Carney – though that presumes he had real values to start with. And it may well be that Carney was willing to compromise his values on behalf of larger goals – he has always struck me as something of a true believer. Such compromises are made often, and probably provide Jack with about 40 percent of his material. ;->

  4. There was a clip on the news last night of Carny sparring with Ed Henry (again).
    He really looked like he was seconds from a brain explosion.

  5. Except for a job like that, fronting as the mouthpiece of the particular administration, Jay Carney’s resignation is not representative of improving the occupier of that position.

    For an administration as dishonest and incompetent and destructive as Obama’s, there will never be an honest person hired for that position. His resignation doesn’t speak anything of the administration or his representation of the administration…because he DID HIS JOB as the White House needed him to.

    Do we think a spokesman is going to get up there after being briefed by the top boss and say “Yeah, we totally botched and lied about Ben Ghazi”. “Oh yeah! That socialist economy destroying vote buying scheme? Nah, we never meant for it to make sense or help people out!”. “Damn right keeping the races uncomfortable with each other is the best way to keep the populace divided against itself!”. “Heck yeah, our lack of Foreign Policy Vision is precisely what we want!”

    All that will replace Jay Carney is Jay Carney 2.0. The resignation changes nothing.

    • Just read your comment from 2013:

      “They will never fire Carney and Carney will never resign. If he were a man of quality he would, however, if he were a man of quality he would have never been appointed to that post because he wouldn’t have been a “to the bitter end” party man.”

      • So maybe he as a shred of dignity left and I was modestly incorrect in my guess OR something even less honorable made a better offer to him.

        That doesn’t change what kind of person they hired or will hire again. This will be no net improvement, unless by some miracle they go through a hiring and firing process of 50 people they have to fire immediately for telling the truth.

        I think my most recent commentary is spot on and my 2013 commentary is off by, what, 5%?

          • Just tweaking you. I also thought he would never resign.
            **********
            Maybe his wife was behind it.
            I can’t imagine he was very good as a husband and father being under all of that stress.
            I often had the feeling he was quite ill-tempered.

  6. As soon as I saw the news, I came right here to see the reaction. That was fast…but, as you admitted, already prepped and ready to go. 🙂

    I also see that Mr. Shinseki is resigning, too. Does anyone ever get fired in this administration?

    • Oh, when the political advisors think the incompetence can’t be blamed on Republicans and the media shows it’s not giving cover. On this issue neither panned out. And that’s the only reason.

      • Oddly, it seems like the only person ever fired by this administration was Shirley Sherrod, late of the Department of Agriculture, and she turned out to have done nothing wrong. Go figure.

    • Shinseki may have “resigned,” but that’s how people are fired in DC. Affords them the opportunity to make it look like their idea.

      The Obamadmin has let a few people go, but Shinseki is probably the most visible and senior ever to be shown the door. And that’s due to the points Jack made – the political advisors knew the situation was untenable.

      What’s interesting is that it was untenable because for the first time in an outrageously long list of incompetence and skullduggery, the Obamadmin managed to get caught in a scandal that left even Democrats from progressive districts vulnerable. NO ONE wants to be seen as dissing veterans – not the most hardcore lefties, not the most rumpswab reporters.

      • Arthur, there is no question that veterans are the absolute worst people to disrespect. First, we are trained to kill, in combat and many of us are then sent out to get some On-The-Job training. Now, there are multiple millions of us, so, yeah, nobody in their right mind wants to piss us off.

        • Yet, something tells me most people’s acts of respect are motivated by recognition of the sacrifice veterans laid themselves down to become.

          Maybe a few are motivated by fear of reprisal…?

          • And I would agree with that wholeheartedly. Point I was making is that those who do dis us do so without thinking about that.

  7. I am speculating that it may be a matter of the rats leaving a sinking ship. Just wait for his “tell all” book in 2016.

  8. “I knew Ron Ziegler, the much-maligned press secretary through much of the Nixon administration. I would trust Ron before I would trust Jay, who would have been a perfect fit for Tricky Dick.” At least Ziegler gave us some truly memorable whoppers. My favorite: “That statement is now inoperable.”

  9. With a name like Josh Earnest at least there’ll be some pithy jokes about the new press secretary from the likes of Iowa Hawk and Mark Styne.

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