The Charlotte Riots: Good Work, Everybody! It Is Now Officially Impossible For Police Officers To Do Their Jobs…Now What?

Thank you,  George Zimmerman. Thank you, Mike Brown, and Freddie Gray. Thank you, Marilyn Mosby, Barack Obama, Ta Nihisi Coates. Thanks, Charles Blow, and Al Sharpton, MSNBC, Sabrina Fulton,  Lezlie McSpadden, and the Democratic National Committee. Thanks, Baltimore Police, Ferguson Police, and Bill DeBlasio.  Thanks, Eric Holder. Thanks, Black Lives Matter. And thanks to you too, Michael Slager, Timothy Loehmann, and the other trigger-happy cops who made their fellow officers around the country vulnerable to accusations of racism and murder by your incompetence. Thanks to all of you and others, it is now impossible for police to do their jobs without fear of being demonized and destroyed if they are wrong, or sparking riots and violence if they are right.

Now what are we supposed to do?

 A Charlotte, North Carolina police officer named Brentley Vinson, an African American, shot and killed Keith L. Scott, 43, after he posed an “imminent deadly threat” to police officers by refusing to drop the weapon he was carrying when ordered to do so.  The shooting sparked night of rioting and violent confrontations between police and “protesters.”

According to police, officers were searching for a suspect with an outstanding warrant. Around 4:00 pm yesterday, police observed Keith Lamont Scott inside his car. (Scott was not the person being sought.) Scott exited the vehicle carrying a firearm, got back into his vehicle, and when officers began to approach his car, got back out of it, again carrying his handgun. Officers ordered him to drop it, and he did not.  The officers fired their weapons at Scott, who was hit and fell. They immediately requested medial assistance and began performing CPR.

Following the pattern of the Ferguson and Freddie Gray incidents, unverified reports spread through social and broadcast media that the victim was a disabled man, holding only a book and no weapon. A woman claiming to be the victim’s daughter used Facebook Live to give her angry, emotional and quite possibly fanciful account of what was transpiring. About a hundred protesters arrived at the site of the shooting. #KeithLamontScott began to trend on Twitter.

A crowd began surrounding officers, and became increasingly hostile and aggressive.  One police officer was injured attempting to calm the crowd, which began to block the street. Over all, twelve officers were hurt. By 8 p.m, police were reporting rioters damaging police vehicles and throwing objects at officers on the scene. One officer was badly injured when he was hit in the face with a rock. The rioting continued for several hours.

At 11 p.m., police ordered the crowd to disperse, which they refused to do. Police then launched tear gas grenades, as the rioters continued to throw projectiles at police and damage property. One group of rioters—don’t call people engaging in violence “protesters” or “demonstrators”; “criminals” is fair, however— gathered near Interstate 85, and began throwing rocks at cars. Motorists reported people throwing rocks off of overpasses onto the traffic below. Tractor trailers were stopped by the crowd and  looted, with their contents strewn over the road. Rioters set fires using the material taken from the trucks. They shut down W.T. Harris Boulevard in both directions near Interstate 8, requiring police in riot gear to again use tear gas. Looters attacked a local Walmart.Note that none of this was driven by the crowd’s knowledge of actual facts, just inflammatory accounts by someone claiming to be a family member. On the videos, people chanting “Hands up! Don’t shoot!” can be heard…appropriate, since that was also a false account used to spark anger, accusations of racism and violent rioting. At this point, any police shooting of a black  man, armed or unarmed, justified or not, is presumptively the result of police hatred of African Americans, and “systemic oppression.” Did I forget to thank Colin Kaepernick? Thank you, Colin Kaepernick! Thank you, NFL, for ratifying his fact-free indictment of the nation as racist.

I already thanked Barack Obama, didn’t I?

Today, a group of activist African-American religious leaders called THUG—I’m not making this up—- held a press conference contradicting police investigators, who said they found Scott’s gun, but not the book his daughter claimed he was carrying. The group has no basis to contradict the police, other than the fact that all police are racist murderers who carry out white society’s conspiracy against blacks. The group said it will take legal action against the city in the case and called on the black community to stage an economic boycott of white-run businesses in Charlotte, because when a black officer kills a black man who won’t drop his gun, it’s the fault of white businesses, or something.

“Since black lives do not matter for this city, then our black dollars should not matter,” said B. J. Murphy, another Charlotte activist. “We’re watching a modern-day lynching on social media, on television and it is affecting the psyche of black people. Everybody in Charlotte should be on notice that black people, today, we’re tired of this bull. We’re tired of being killed and nobody saying nothing. We’re tired of our political leaders going along to get along; they’re so weak, they don’t have no sympathy for our grief. And we want justice.” (This is called “helpful rhetoric.”)

“Round and round and round it goes, and where it stops, nobody knows.” This is all a continuation of the Trayvon Martin-George Zimmerman Ethics Train Wreck and the Ferguson Ethics Train Wreck it spawned. Instead of making an effort to stem the cultural and societal damage being wreaked by both, cynical politicians and race-hustlers—as well as cynical politicians who are race-hustlers—decided to exploit the episodes for persona gain and political power. Now I don’t think those train wrecks can be stopped, at least not before a large chuck of the nation is in chaos, and the healing time will be counted in decades, not months. And, of course, black communities will suffer most.

Good job, everybody.

 _____________________________
Sources: New York Times, Charlotte Observor

 

 

42 Comments

Filed under U.S. Society

42 responses to “The Charlotte Riots: Good Work, Everybody! It Is Now Officially Impossible For Police Officers To Do Their Jobs…Now What?

  1. Other Bill

    What do these activists want? They want police out of their neighborhoods. They want policing to cease. Fine by me.

    • dragin_dragon

      OB, I would almost agree with you, but this is the same mentality that says we should get totally out of the Middle East, and let the Muslims fight it out amongst themselves. Eventually, we are going to HAVE to fix this. There are too many nation-states that are trying for superiority and/or invincibility to let this continue unabated. It is pretty much tantamount to saying that WWII was a ‘European problem’, so let them solve it. Wouldn’t work then, won’t work now. There’s too much at stake, and too many other people are going to be affected. The police CANNOT be hamstrung, since it is their job to keep the peace and insure public safety. Like it or not, they are all that stands between us and anarchy, or open revolution. By the same token, the police HAVE to temper their responses, such that a man with his hands on the side of his car is not shot for ‘reaching for a “non-existent” weapon in his car’ is shot and killed. The other case, when a man is shot for refusing to drop his side-arm is justified. At some point, all of us, white, black or some where in between have to realize that a person with a 9MM on his/her hip needs to be taken seriously, and cooperate with them. Of course, if it is your desire to be a martyr, then go for it. Unfortunately, there is likely no afterlife, so you are going to dead, dead, DEAD, but by golly, you’ll be famous. I assume that this is not what you are proposing, but black crime, in black neighborhoods will eventually spill into otherwise white or latino neighborhoods and we will eventually be looking at a race-driven civil war. Hopefully, that is not what you are after, but that is what you will get. And the answer is so simple…if everyone who is innocent would just ACT LIKE IT, there would be no problem.

      • valkygrrl

        Their responses are drilled into them. See anything as a threat and then shoot it. That’s why I want to fire the cops, all of them and start over either with new people or with new people and a different system for law enforcement.

        Simply put, I don’t think the current cops can moderate their responses after all this time.

      • Other Bill

        I agree with you double d. I was just answering Jack’s implied or explicit question of “What do these people want?” I’ve heard BLM people quoted as saying they literally want the police to stop policing. Makes no sense but that’s the logical extension of the general stance. “Cops are murdering us. Cops bad. Get rid of the cops.” And yes, it’s the equivalent of the isolationist/pacifist take on foreign affairs. Again, I think in the current American setting, the intractable poverty and misery in the black under class is driving otherwise rational people nuts. And yes, man do we need better police training and hiring. Awful. The Tulsa thing looks hideous, as Sparty points out below. But I will say, there are what, 330 Million people in the country and how many police interactions with people a day and how many police officers and departments. It’s a big country and size matters.

    • The question ‘What do they want’ is a good one. I don’t have great strength in understanding American government generally, so I am now making an effort to study textbooks on it, but I came acorss an interesting comment in ‘American Government & Politics’ by Robert Singh.

      Everyone wo immigrates to American *joins* America and they must agree to the Creed. Their participation is willed and voluntary. But for the African in America this was not the case, and I suggest it is still not the case. Nor will it ever be the case. Therefor, it stands likely that now and in the future the Black population will always be a problem and in this sense will never have a home here.

      To say such things as I just said is highly problematic because the statement itself turns against the Creed of Americanism: a unity based on a conscious agreement; a voluntary choice to participate in a political union whose basis is a political agreement: the Lincolnian Proposition. The thing is, you see, with people who think and theorize as I do, that we begin not to believe this Proposition and we begin to understand that to achieve unity more is required than just the conscious political agreement.

      The sort of union that is at the core of Americanism was based in the understanding that arose and could only arise between essential peers. That is, between Englishmen. America functioned brilliantly when it was a cohesive Protestant nation. In the 20s and 30s there was a will to keep America just that sort of nation but in 1965 another, and a radically different path was chosen. In the course of time, by conscious choice or by political and social clamoring, the demographic of the US was radically shifted. What it was, and what it *united*, is now becoming evermore unrecognizable. And the process of disunity is now visible. It took 40 years or so, a small bit of time in the lift of a nation.

      What I have just said is an effort to state facts, and to resist fantasy, political idealism, and other nonsense.

      That is why I say that Black America, should have their own State, their own Nation. I believe that basically this is what they clamor for. It would not be a waste of time to dedicate oneself to plunging the psychology of blackness in America. I feel I have made a substantial effort here through a good 6 months of reading historical (60s) Black literature. What they require is Black Nationhood.

      But this much I can also say: I have no desire to unify with Black America, because I have no relationship at all with their history, their struggle, their self-definition, nor their movement as a people through time. Despite appearances, despite *framing*, this is not ‘racism’ it is race-realism and realism generally. I advocate therefor for education that presents the case for disunity and for establishing or renewing distinction.

      So, by my attempt to define and understand ‘what they want’ I have, as is natural and necessary, defined my relationship to them and what they do (in time, in history), and the inevitable concommitant is a definition about who and what I AM. This is ‘identitarianism’ in a nutshell. These are two related processes in fact.

      There are movements in at least 40 countries from Canada to Australia, from Romania to South Africa, of people who are working out these ideas, views, perspectives and definitions. I think it safe to say that we are working to get out of the *you are evil* designation. This is 9/10ths of the struggle as it stands.

  2. Spartan

    You forgot to thank the Tulsa police force.

  3. carcarwhite

    when we believe something, we find evidence to support our beliefs. until people are willing to question their beliefs. “police officers want to kill black people” (is it true?) and really get still with it, this won’t change. NO evidence can stand in the mind of someone who’s mind is closed and already “knows” the “truth.” this includes me in my beliefs. (though this is not one of them)

    i’ve noticed being very quite now in discussions (because they aren’t discussions anymore) because when i even ask a question that is not in line with the “group think” i am marked a troll, bigot, racist, etc. it’s very sad.

    the only way to solve this has to start with each of us individually. each of us listening and really trying to “hear” what is “really” going on. because there is so much more going on than what they are claiming. it’s disheartening and is trying my patience. a LOT. i don’t think it’s going to change unless we make a difference one on one.

    even really cool, balanced people i know are losing their minds over this stuff. the lies that are being told over and over are starting to be believed.

    this stuff goes deep though. believing the worst about people. all that stuff… getting to the core seems to change hearts most. i seem to discover a lot of fear. fear makes people nuts and unable to see clearly.

    for me i have to deal with it in myself and i notice i’m now afraid to say what i think in groups or social media. (i tend to not be on any side so i seem to offend both sides, though the liberals are for sure the most unreasonable in these exchanges and least open to listening… there seems to be a smug arrogance there.)

    ok, sorry if i went off topic. thank you for being a place of support for me during these crazy times, or times that make me feel crazy.

  4. Wayne

    Well the Charlotte police seemed to show remarkable restraint in using non lethal weapontry and tear gas only to deal with the thugs who seemed intent on provoking them and destroying property of businesses that serve the community. Let us hope that this doesn’t turn another LA riot situation where the National Guard gets called up.

    • zoebrain

      Probably too late for that, alas. The usual suspects interested only in creating mayhem will be hiding amongst the rest by now, using them as cover. The call has gone out on anarchist lists on the darkweb, and there’s a lot of money to be made from looting.

      • valkygrrl

        Didn’t know you were hanging around on the darknets. Hidden depths. Uh how do they say it in Aussieland? Good on you mate?

        • zoebrain

          As a parent, it’s my duty to keep a watchful eye on my 15 yr old son’s Internet activities. His email conversations with Nigel Farange rather floored me. So yes, I keep a scan on the Darkweb sites he visits too, at his request.

          He has a natural talent for negotiating public transport timetable websites, so has been the transport coordinator for several demonstrations.

          • zoebrain

            Not the riots in NC. But he could easily find out who organised the various outside groups involved, the criminal gangs, the political extremists, and the ones just in it for the mindless violence with no chance of being caught.

            • dragin_dragon

              “Not the riots in NC. But he could easily find out who organised the various outside groups involved, the criminal gangs, the political extremists, and the ones just in it for the mindless violence with no chance of being caught.”

              Unfortunately, I suspect that, if he were to acquire such information, his life would not be worth a plug nickel. If he were to make such knowledge public, he would need security equal to the Presidential Protection Detail.

              • zoebrain

                I have almost limitless capacity to believe in the incompetence of security services. Almost limitless. Not completely so. This data is known. Getting it with an audit trail of provenance that satisfies requirements for admissability of evidence is something else, and what would be the charges? It’s just a set of timetables guaranteed to get a set of people from widely scattered locales to concentrate at one point and time, and at minimal cost as many are impecunious.

  5. zoebrain

    According to police…. yes, we’ve heard that before, and often it’s true.

    But may I ask to see the camera footage? Or will it be yet another case where for some unaccountable reason, the officer wasn’t wearing a camera, or it was switched off, and none of the other officers had cameras, or they malfunctioned…

    Cameras are the good police’s friend, and they are the majority. When there’s a systemic pattern of inexplicable malfunctions, or them not being available that day (but on previous and succeeding days) etc etc then exactly why should they be believed, seeing all of the many cases where 3rd party video evidence directly contradicted police accounts?

    Camera footage would do much to restore trust that has been lost. It could be used to rebut claims that the deceased wasn’t acting in a threatening manner, was holding a book not a gun etc.

    • Other Bill

      Does anyone know how much a body camera (so-called) costs? Can’t be very much. probably less than a Kevlar vest, not much more than a badge

    • My advice is to actually check the facts before dropping rocks on people and setting things on fire. But that’s just me.

      • zoebrain

        The facts are that someone was shot dead. We can be pretty sure of that. Much of the rest is in contention. In this case, I’m inclined to believe the police version, with the exception of him exhibiting threatening behaviour, on that one I’ll keep an open mind.

        It is also a fact that whenever a policeman is afraid for his life, he has the legal authority to end the threat with deadly force. Apparently many police are afraid of black males, even in fear of their lives. That’s not to say they’re racist, just terrified of them.

        This fear is not entirely without foundation now, but is ridiculously exaggerated.

        • I think that’s a fair assessment.

          I also think it shouldn’t be that hard to avoid making even the most unqualified, paranoid and fearful police officers afraid for their lives, no matter what color you are.

          • zoebrain

            It shouldn’t be. Apparently it is though. Riots don’t help.

            Blacks have been taught to fear the police as a deadly enemy definitely armed with guns and willing to use them at the drop of a hat. Police have been taught to fear Black males as a deadly enemy potentially armed with guns who will fire first unless shot first.

            Both have enough evidence to back those fears that even the most reasonable people in those groups can’t be entirely sure that the member of the other group they’re confronted with isn’t like that. Then as a catalyst, add in the smattering of actual racists on both sides.

            The difference is that only one side is immune from prosecution, de facto if not de jure, but often de jure as well.

            If a white openly carrying a gun in an open carry state is confronted by police, the default is not to shoot first. If a black does the same… or appears to be carrying a gun, or might have something, a book, a phone, an x-box controller, or just a shadow that could be mistaken for a gun… the outcome is different.

            At least if they have a gun, and a command “drop the gun” is given, they are able to comply. But if not, then they’re noncompliant, which can be interpreted as a threat requiring maximum deadly force.

            In theory, there should never be any cases of unarmed civilians being shot by police, especially if on the ground. Mistakes will happen, but not to this extent. A handful per decade, not hundreds per year.

      • zoebrain

        How not to do it:

        North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory signed legislation Monday that will make it much harder for the general public to view police recordings.

        House Bill 972 has placed severe restrictions on police body camera and dashboard footage, limiting the video or audio files to the civilians captured in them. Those individuals and their representatives can request a viewing from the police department, but they are not permitted to make copies for their own records.

        • What could possibly be the rationalization for that?

          • valkygrrl

            That members of marginalized groups or persons at high risk of abuse from third parties are put in danger by having video of them made public. Not permitting people in the videos to make copies though, that’s so far out of line it looks like a 3 year old’s coloring book.

            Here’s a copy of the law, http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2015/Bills/House/PDF/H972v8.pdf

          • zoebrain

            Rationalisation? This perhaps.

            http://www.thenewcivilrightsmovement.com/davidbadash/watch_body_and_dash_cam_video_of_shooting_of_keith_lamont_scott

            The dash cam video in particular. I won’t comment further lest I introduce my own subjective interpretation into other viewers’ minds before viewing.

            • Can’t tell a thing from either. Watched them four times each. Bottom line: if he had a gun and refused to drop it, then the cops are in the clear. If he didn’t have a gun, it’s murder. And the wife screaming at the guy didn’t help matters.

            • You can tell much from the videos. One is the posture of the police: arms drawn, cautious, frightened, and alert to the prospect of getting shot. They clearly perceive a danger and this to me indicates a strong likelihood there is a danger there. However, for non-police and inexperienced persons I suggest they don’t know how to look at these images. I have reviewed video commentary (voice over the videos) and noticed people more or less making up a narrative. There IS a danger in submitting these sorts of videos to the masses.

              The bottom line certainly does apply here: there was a gun. Unfortunatley there is no clear video image of the weapon in his hand.

              Zoebrain writes: “Blacks have been taught to fear the police as a deadly enemy definitely armed with guns and willing to use them at the drop of a hat. Police have been taught to fear Black males as a deadly enemy potentially armed with guns who will fire first unless shot first.”

              This is a rhetorically-charged statement. It does not clarify. It contains and expresses previously established opinions and views.

              There are different possible descriptions. Here is one: Over the last 25 years a Black subculture has arisen. Rap culture and gan-based culture. Violent, combative, resisting, counter-cultural, drug-focused and given over to overt sensuality and vulgarity, it is a kind of mind-set that has infected culture, both white, latino and black.

              More and more young men have been caught up in the whole mystique of this rap culture. And when they have interactions with the police they do so as resisters, and in many settings they have weapons. And of course these weapons are used all the time in Black communities, Black-on-Black.

              The police know, even if you do not know, what segment of the population they are dealing with and they take precuations. They do so because they want to return from a day’s work alive. And their families and children want the same thing. There is NO REASON why they should not protect themselves, and NO ARGUMENT that can defend any other *approach* to police work, given the conditions.

              When you take these factors into account, and then return to your paragraph, I suggest that it can easily be seen that you adopt the white liberal apologetic narrative which (as I say) has *infected* perception. Your problem is the media’s problem, is white America’s problem as well. The *lens* that you place before your eyes (based on what you SAY) distorts your perception.

              You feed with your narrative the BLM mentality, which does not care one Greek iota for truth or facts. Because in essence it is a manifestation of the Black gang activism which has to do with power and a desire to dominate. It is raw, unthinking, visceral and emotional.

              I suggest that when one sees this, and sees it clearly, one does so because one has popped a specific ideological bubble which victimizes Blacks and participates in a false-narrative construct of victimization. It feeds not a creative community-building spirit, but something radically different: a destructive, degenerative set of actions and activities which are simply DESTRUCTIVE.

              What is the cure? To see that this is a form of *racism* in itself. That’s what I think. To empower Black is to see them — and demand that they be — creative agents, not dumb loud and foulmouthed troublemakers given over to criminality. All the communities where these big events have occuured are communities with these specific problems. The problem is IN THESE COMMUNITIES themselves, and that these people cannot or won’t control themselves. That is the *bottom line*. They do not deserve help and assistance, they require harsh counter-violence.

              This cultural manifestation must literally be beaten back. I am not joking and I am not exaggerating. The cure for rioting is to be shot. Bottom line This requires a level of decisiveness that is simply not possible right now. There is no ‘negotiation’ that will get ANYWHERE with this mob violence.

              And because it will not be resisted and countered, and Black know this, and everyone knows this, things will continue as they have been.

              The real question is to predict, to visualize, what it is that will end it. And how.

              My argument is that Blacks need, in essence, their own nation. I know that this is seen as impossible and thereofr unreal. Perhaps. But what this means is that they must define themselves as a people and a nation. They have not been able, not really, to do this.

  6. Steve

    What they are after is to divide us, us against them narrative, identity politics at the worst and the democrats think they can get the black community spun up enough that they will be passionate to go out and vote. The rhetoric will continue and divide us further. It is working too, a normally rational, smart and fair friend said the other day that he is tired of the shit and that he is not going to let them get away with these abuses, that nothing will change his mind on voting to insure we have a president that will stop this madness.

    Doesn’t really matter what side he was talking about just that the divide is getting so bad that people are becoming irrational.

    • You make me realize that I may only superficially understand ‘their motive’. So in my view the question is still open: What are *they* trying to achieve? What is the goal or aspiration of this movement? And how could that be spoken about since, it seems, there are numerous factions.

      Some thoughts:

      1) I have wondered if, psychologically and within the black psyche, there is a self-recognition of incompatability with America, American institutions, and the ‘American project’, even perhaps the ‘American Creed’. No matter what is done, or not done, the condition of Blacks in America seems hobbled. Psychologically, I’d imagine this creates resentment, and this resentment is expressed by lashing out at the *system*.

      2) What if, essentially, the problem is not one that arises out of rational, ordered thought, but is irrational? Riots, blocking freeways, putting on what seems nearly a celebratory block-party of destruction, resistance and protest, seems to support this claim. While it is true that in some notable cases Blacks have gotten shot by poilice, perhaps disproportionately (though perhaps not), it is also true that the *narrative* that has been formed in reaction seems to be independent of the events. So, it does not matter if the event is seen as having been *justified*; the event no matter what will be seen as it is desired to be seen. If so it circles the question back around again to the front: What exactly is desired? What does it take to settle it?

      3) Are Blacks being manipulated by activists within the Democratic Party specifically for purposes of securing a vote block that will vote Democrat, and thus ensure the Party’s continued strength and dominance culturally?

      4) I am really interested in this question of ‘Unity’. I have asked myself if notions of American ‘unity’ have lost their unifying power. It is not an *evil* question to ask. Whenever I hear politicians speak of ‘unity’, and when I think of the use of the word, I know that they do not really mean ‘unity’. It is a political and even a propaganda term. The polity of the US seems to be more accurately disunited in so many ways and areas, and yet there is a Federal ideal of *unity* which is then a sort of National Lie. In any case, the notion of American Unity is (if I am correct in my perception) largely a post-Sixties construct. But as I said previously, the choices made in the Sixties, when carried forward, seem to be tearing things apart, not unifying them. I ask the question: Is this true?

      5) Does ‘rhetoric’ divide? Can rhetoric divide those who are united? I mean, really united? Actually rhetoric cannot divide if there is not a cause or a reason for dvision. Rhetoric in the sense you mean can inflame the existent division but it cannot create it. In fact it is ‘rhetoric’ (or perhaps false-rhetoric) that is used to (falsely) unite.

      5a) Subquestion: What would strict and honest truth-telling do in our Present? That is, a total commitment to 1) cut through the rhetorical layers, and 2) cease lying, and 3) start telling the truth?

      6) When one get ‘tired of the BS’ and one get resolved against it, what does one do? Obviously one tells the truth.

      6a) Subquestion: Who is really ‘telling the truth’? And what exactly is this truth that should be told?

      7) What President will stop the madness? Is it realistic to imagine the executive has that much power? If the problem is an ‘executive problem’, which it certainly cannot be that alone, the election of a specific President would be a solution. But this has just what to do with the president or that office?

      7a) Commentary: Any move, any election, will not and cannot ‘stop the madness’. The underlying causes of madness have to be seen and addressed.

      7b) Further comment: Good Luck!

  7. Jack writes: “Now I don’t think those train wrecks can be stopped, at least not before a large chuck of the nation is in chaos, and the healing time will be counted in decades, not months. And, of course, black communities will suffer most.”
    ____________________

    My impression is that all this *writing on the wall* was written out a long time ago. The integration of America in the 50s and 60s and the post-60s was a sort of forced effort. Certainly by government edict, no one could deny. But then on the other side a more interesting, if also more problematic, forced effort: The force of moral will. When we do things, not so much because they rise up in us and take form in the world because of a truly moral decision, but because we are compelled to do so, our efforts are not fully sincere.

    I do not have it all figured out but I can see pretty easily that America’s race-unity and multicultural Creed has a base in religious will, in religious *command* as it were: Thou Shalt. This will was applied through Constitutional means (the religious edicts became law) and yet it was and it still is superficial. You cannot *make* a people become united is what it comes down to.

    People reading what I write and think immediately assume I am a darkened benighted soul but this is not the case (yet any self-defense only cements the impression). Yet I have set myself to the task of *seeing things as they are* and gaining the strength to *explain what I see* without self-deception. That means: without lying to myself (or to others). I see this as the only basis for ethical choice.

    What has been set in motion — if I base this on your analysis — has been set in motion by *them* and not by *us* (I mean, that what is arising has been caused and broght about by Black will and activism exclusively), then I do not have to take responsibility for it. It is not my problem and my issue to solve even though I will be affected by it. Let their political will congeal therefor, and let it congeal into nationhood.

    At this point what else can ‘healing’ mean? So, taking it back to the historical root to heal the problem is to help Blacks to achieve sovereign nationhood.

    I do not think it unethical therefor to become conscious and cognizant of what, exactly, is occurring, and to prepare for where it will lead. Is this a disaster? or political and social opportunity?

  8. http://baltimoregazette.com/atlanta-officer-kills-black-woman-following-breastfeeding-argument/

    I’ll need a second source for this, and maybe a third before I give it too much credence. Either someone is deliberately stirring the pot with false stories to promote violence, or it’s bad. Either way it needs watching.

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