Comment Of The Day: “The President Is Right About The Mainstream News Media, And It Can’t Handle The Truth, Part III: The Tweet”

sailfishReader Greg boldly ventures into the perilous waters of distinguishing among what the news media calls lies, especially when they involve President Trump. His piece is also a fortuitous companion to this post, which I was completing when his appeared.

Here is Greg’s Comment of the Day on the post, “The President Is Right About The Mainstream News Media, And It Can’t Handle The Truth, Part III: The Tweet”:

The media coverage of “Donald Trump’s lies,” and most recently of the stupid Sweden controversy, conflates several different categories of statements and treats them all as being equally serious. For example, let’s suppose Trump tells this story at one of his rallies:

“I was out on the boat – last week with Bill Clinton – just off the coast a few miles away from Mar a Lago – one of the great resorts of the world, by the way — and pulled in a 9-foot sailfish, the biggest sailfish ever caught. The biggest in those waters. It was a hell of a fight – gigantic fish almost pulled me overboard, one of the hands grabbed me and saved me really, kept me from going in – (Trump mimes himself almost falling into the water and being pulled back, to comic effect) – a Cuban immigrant by the way, a legal one and America can be proud of him.”

And let’s suppose that the next day the New York Times prints a front page story hysterically denouncing this story as a lie. When we read the article, we may find out that Trump’s story was any of the following:

1. An outright lie: Trump has never caught a sailfish in his life.

2. An exaggeration to make Trump look better: The exaggeration may be relatively slight (the sailfish wasn’t 9 feet long; it was 8 feet, which is still an awfully big fish) or gross (it was a 4-foot sailfish, which is puny).

3. An enhancement to make the story more entertaining: Trump is actually a terrific fisherman. He didn’t need any help and never came close to falling into the water.

4. A statement that Trump made without regard to its truth or falsity: The hand has a Hispanic accent but Trump has no idea whether he is a Cuban immigrant or not. He added that part to the story because it supports one of his pet policy positions. Actually, the hand is an American citizen born in Miami, and he is of Guatemalan ancestry, not Cuban.

5. An ignorant, lazy but honest error: The captain flattered Trump by telling him that his sailfish was the biggest ever caught in those waters, and Trump never bothered to look up the facts in a reputable reference source. Actually Trump’s fish was a full foot short of the record.

6. Mis-remembered: The way he remembers it, he was fishing off Mar a Lago that day, but actually he was 1,000 miles away, off the coast of the Dominican Republic.

7. True, but Trump’s thoughts are so much faster than his tongue and his syntax is so garbled that the story gives a false impression: Trump actually caught the fish 5 years ago while fishing with Tiger Woods. Trump didn’t mean he caught the fish with Bill Clinton last week. He meant that he just now had a fleeting thought about an interview with Bill Clinton that he saw last week on TV, which reminds him that he once read in the New York Post that Clinton had gone deep-sea fishing with Ron Burkle, which reminds him of his own triumph with the sailfish. As Trump so often does, he was sharing his train of thought, in a disjointed way, with his audience. The surprising thing is that, often, his gestures and tone of voice convey his meaning clearly to his friendly audience, even though it is completely lost on a hostile press and in transcripts.

8. Either true or false, depending on your point of view: Trump was actually fishing near the Bahamas, 100 miles away from Mar a Lago, which he considers pretty close but the Times considers pretty far. The Times accuses Trump of lying in order to attract fishermen to his resort at Mar a Lago and boost his own profits.

9. True, but said in a context that creates an unfortunate impression, at least in the mind of a hostile press: After the sailfish story, Trump segues into a story about the movie, Jaws, where the protagonist shot a great white shark with a high-powered rifle (“a great, great thing,” says Trump, “and there are a lot of good people in this country – second amendment, NRA – Obama and Clinton wouldn’t let you shoot a shark like that — but now that I’m president you and good Americans like you will have the freedom to do that”), which leads the Times to accuse Trump of shooting sailfish and supporting people who shoot endangered great white sharks and other species of endangered fish and possibly having shot endangered fish himself and maybe even having shot endangered whales and dolphins.

10. True in every detail, but the Times is calling it a lie anyway: The Times says the story creates the false impression that the fishing is good near Mar a Lago, which Trump is implying in order to boost profits from his resort, but the truth is that big sailfish over 7 feet long are rare in those waters and Trump’s record-setting catch was a fluke.

The Times will be equally outraged no matter which category Trump’s story falls into. But most people who are not blinded by Trump-hatred don’t consider these lies (or “lies”) to be equally outrageous. And in any case, sane people understand that lies about catching fish really don’t matter, and the Times ought to calm down and devote its front page to something important.

The stupid Sweden controversy seems to be a combination of 7, 9 and a bit of 5. What Trump said was this:

“We’ve got to keep our country safe. You look at what’s happening in Germany. You look at what’s happening last night in Sweden. Sweden, who would believe this? Sweden. They took in large numbers. They’re having problems like they never thought possible. You look at what’s happening in Brussels. You look at what’s happening all over the world. Take a look at Nice. Take a look at Paris.”

By the words, “last night,” Trump didn’t mean, “This happened in Sweden last night.” As in statement 7 above, he meant, “Last night, I saw a woman interviewed on Fox about Sweden.” That’s what his clarification says he meant, and I find that explanation completely plausible, since it has been widely reported that he sits around all night watching TV news, especially Fox. As in statement 9 above, the context of his statement, abutting references to places where terrorist attacks have taken place, created the unfortunate impression that he was referring to a terrorist attack in Sweden, which had not happened. And as in paragraph 5, he probably doesn’t know anything much about what’s really happening in Sweden, other than what Fox say, which he relies upon completely without checking with any of the better-informed sources readily available to him as president. Unlike the example that I gave in paragraph 5, though, Trump probably is correct this time: Sweden really does seem to have created some serious problems for itself by taking in large numbers of immigrants.

16 Comments

Filed under Character, Comment of the Day, Ethics Alarms Award Nominee, Government & Politics, Journalism & Media

16 responses to “Comment Of The Day: “The President Is Right About The Mainstream News Media, And It Can’t Handle The Truth, Part III: The Tweet”

  1. Quote “Fox say, which he relies upon completely without checking with any of the better-informed sources readily available to him as president. Unlike the example that I gave in paragraph 5, though, Trump probably is correct this time: Sweden really does seem to have created some serious problems for itself by taking in large numbers of immigrants.”

    Given your article and Trump’s aversion to the media, what sources those that be?

  2. Zanshin

    Nice. As I read an article I also read all the comments. Seldom do I go back to read the comments placed after I’ve read the article.
    CotD is a good way to have me read an excellent comment that I would otherwise have missed.

  3. dragin_dragon

    Wife and I, after a bit of discussion, reached the same conclusion. Still, however, agree that he needs to consider what he says, which he is obviously not doing right now.

  4. Wayne

    This whole story sounds pretty fishy to me. ((Sorry, I couldn’t resist.)

  5. Paul Compton

    I suspect President Trump currently relies far less on scripted speeches and speech writers than most Presidents, and probably always will. The result is that it will be much easier for him to get his feet, often both at once, caught in his mouth.

  6. I think it was a great choice for CotD, and I find myself pretty much in agreement with most of what was said in it. What it (the comment) mainly does in my mind, is reinforce my belief that until the current atmosphere of hysteria that the media continues to generate around the new President (with plenty of help from the intel community) dissipates, we’ll never be able to tell if there isn’t some actual good mixed in with the gaffes that are coming out of the White House on a regular basis. This is a President like no other, and as such, I feel his actions need to be looked upon in an entirely new manner. So far, however, the best I can come up with is that at least SOME of the things he’s done that at first glance might appear bad, could more properly be labeled “awkward”. But where I go from there, I still have no idea.

  7. Pennagain

    Well done, Greg, and thanks for the Rashomon read.

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